Red Carpet Green Dress™ and Lenzing’s TENCEL™ brand collaborate on sustainable eco-couture textiles for the OSCARS®

Following the success of their 2020 partnership, Red Carpet Green Dress and TENCEL™ brand from sustainability leader Lenzing, are excited to announce the extension of the organisations’ collaboration for a second year running at the 93rd Academy Awards®

As a part of the collaboration, RCGD x TENCEL™ launched a range of eco-couture materials made from TENCEL™ branded materials are currently being adapted into bespoke looks for a number of this year’s Oscars® nominees and physical red carpet guests. Paying homage to RCGD’s roots as a design contest, the looks themselves and the talent wearing these designs are to be unveiled the night of the Oscars on Sunday 25th April. For the first time in its history, the Oscars® is to be hosted across multiple sites in the USA and Europe. In what has been an unusual year for many, Red Carpet Green Dress is working to honour their commitment in creating design solutions that work from moment to movement on the red carpet of the biggest of all global stages.

Last year at the Oscars, RCGD x TENCEL™ partnered with Louis Vuitton and created sustainable a custom-made gown for James Bond Spectre’s Léa Seydoux to wear in attendance to the 92nd Academy Awards® as an ambas sador for RCGD. Meanwhile, filmmaker Elena Andreicheva took home an Oscar wearing a sustainable gown created from RCGD x TENCEL™ Luxe branded fabrics in partnership with couture designer Laura Basci. In addition, a stunning design created by leading ethical luxury designer Benedetti Life, that featured an RCGD x TENCEL Luxe eco-couture textile, was revealed at the Red Carpet Green Dress Pre-Oscar Gala last year.

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Sustainable disposal

Here are some of our tips to dispose of clothes sustainably:

✔️Can it be repaired? First check if it really needs to be ‘disposed’ of. Can the item be repaired? There are plenty of fantastic articles out there and great tutorials online to help you repair your clothes. Or perhaps you know someone who can help you?
✔️Sell or swap your clothes. Call up your friends and hold a clothes swap party or sell them to people in your local area. There are apps for selling second hand clothes and a lot of social media apps have shop areas where you can sell clothes.
✔️ Donate to charity. Your clothes may bring joy to someone else so be sure to look into your local second hand shops.
✔️ Give to an animal shelter. Some animal shelters will use things like old t-shirts, blankets, sheets etc so it’s always worth an ask.
✔️ Textile collections. Some areas will have textile collections from their local council so give your local council a call and see what they offer.
✔️ Local textile & fabric recycling spots. Do some research and see if your area has any textile and fabric banks where you can drop of your clothes.

 


Any to add?

Water pledge during Earth Month

Water is a fundamental resource in the fashion world. Textiles production (including cotton farming) uses around 93 billion cubic metres of water annually, and 20% of industrial water pollution globally is attributable to the dyeing and treatment of textiles. This presents grave problems, including lack of access to clean, drinking water in water-scarce regions and fatal health conditions for communities living near these waters.
More brands are exploring sustainable production methods such as waterless dyeing but if we want to sustain this planet for new healthy generations, there is an urgent need to move beyond incremental improvements. The textiles industry must be transformed into a circular economic model but this level of collaboration is a global effort amongst policymakers, NGOs, international bodies, industry associations, businesses, decision makers concerning public infrastructure, and consumers. It is a long road ahead, but certainly not impossible.
Let’s share some water pledges so we can help do our bit;
  • I pledge to carry a re-usable bottle around with me and use where I would have ordinarily received a take away cup/disposable plastic bottle
  • I pledge to turn off the tap when brushing my teeth to reduce wasted water consumption
We will be sharing pledges throughout the month for you to get involved in and we would love to know your ideas on pledges we could share with our community. We have pledges on food, fashion, water, air pollution and waste, let’s share!

RCGD is on Clubhouse

We are on Clubhouse!

Sustainability with RCGD is a space for learning, connecting & growing. Rooted in education & factual content, our club provides an accessible breakdown of sustainability, the opportunities & challenges. We love sustainability which centres people, business and planet. Calling all people! Curious listeners, creatives, brands big or small, NGOs and organisations creating positive environmental and social impact across the globe, innovators creating accessible solutions for global communities across to sustainability learners and curious listeners!

🍃WHAT TO EXPECT 🍃

* Authentic conversations about sustainability

*Diving into topics like circularity, climate change, biodiversity, technology, social justice, design & more

* Insight into RCGD at the Oscars & RCGD Global Design Contest opportunities for global creatives (established/emerging) 

* Chats about design solutions from materials to dyes 

* Collab talks & lively networking

* Drop-ins from the community including CEO Samata, founder Suzy Amis Cameron & a variety of brilliant minds (including you!)

*Community vibe sessions and joy

📔WHEN

Wed / Thurs / Sun

8.30pm GMT, 1.30pm PT & 4.30pm ET 

Schedule published weekly. 

Find us on Clubhouse here.

Gen Z environmentalists doing their thing for our planet!

We are always really excited to see Gen Z environmentalists doing their thing for our planet and we love to spotlight them!
Today we would like to spotlight Dyson Chee, Founder of Project O.C.E.A.N. Hawaiʻi . Project O.C.E.A.N. Hawaiʻi has a goal to keep Hawaii beautiful by tackling plastic pollution and Dyson is making that happen! Dyson is also Advocacy Director for Hawaii Youth Climate Coalition, a High school and college led nonprofit organization focused on fighting the climate crisis through education and advocacy and Coalition Director for Vote 16 Hawai’i, a coalition of youth working to lower the voting age to 16 in Hawai’i and to spark conversations about government, youth power, and representation.
“As a kid, I would spear fish with my family, as well as body board and snorkel. And as my love for the ocean grew I began to notice problems. When we looked for coral, fish or turtles, we’d find microplastics, straws, potato-chip bags…At first, it didn’t seem a big deal, but soon I realised the conditions for aquatic life were degrading. Aged 14, I was thinking, ‘If I’m seeing this now, how much worse is it going to get?’…”- Dyson Chee
Do you know an eco-warrior that inspires you?

A throwback to the evolution of Missi Pyle’s gown by Valentina Delfino

In February 2012 at the 84th Annual Academy Awards actress Missi Pyle (The Artist) took to the carpet in a flowing blue gown made from organic silk and peace silk, hand-dyed with mineral dye and lined with recycled polyester from excess waste fabric. Venezuelan born, Miami-based designer Valentina Delfino’s gown was dyed in an OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) approved facility in Los Angeles by Edwina Pellikka. Designer Angelo Santos created Valentina’s gown with Birgit Muller.

Sanah Sharma’s Question, ‘What’s your superpower?’

Everything in the world is moving, growing, evolving – this is the law of our universe. So there are really no final destinations, just a journey that changes course upon new realisations, new responses to new stimuli. However, as a species that is deeply interconnected, our journeys are bound to intersect and these moments are opportunities to share what we have gathered in our existence and discover new paths!

My name is Sanah and today as you read this, our paths have crossed. So I’m going to make the most of this precious moment and share my story with you. Who knows, you may just find your next journey on this page!

I was born to middle-class Indian parents and we lived in the Indian east coast city of Chennai, which is still my home. I believe the place we grow up in and the people around us can shape our mindsets and ethos for all of our adulthood. By profession, I am a fashion designer specialising in sustainable design. Having published my research academically, I also teach my methods of practice through guest lectures and workshops. At my core, I’m a seeker with an eternal quest to be an original observer, trying to leave behind the right kind of footsteps for my co-travellers.

I joined design school in the summer of 2011 and almost immediately felt disillusioned. The world of fashion is so commonly associated with its glamorous garb that the beauty of its processes get hidden much like a beautiful face under a shiny mask. It’s not the fashion shows and ad campaigns, it’s the magic of a needle and thread, unravelling the imagination of a creative spirit. During my last year of school, I saw myself drawn to process-oriented research and I quite honestly drowned myself in a heap of academic papers that I’d read to quench my thirst of curiosity about the industry I was about to enter. The year was 2014 and the awareness within school and public media in India about fashion and sustainability was a large void. However, the research I was reading was flooded with information about the unsustainable methods within the industry. This became my new stimuli and I was determined to find a response to it. Thus began my journey into sustainable fashion and lifestyle. After months of exploration, in early 2015 I developed Planar Flux – a cutting technique that drew inspiration from a math concept called Mobius Strip and Subtraction Cutting. Planar Flux was able to create layers and volume using one continuous piece of fabric while drastically reducing fabric consumption. My graduation collection was made using this new technique and fetched me the award for Most Innovative Collection as well as Best Academic performance. About six months after I graduated, I shot out an email to the creator of the Subtraction Cutting technique, Julian Roberts who teaches at Royal College of Art (UK). The next morning when I turned on my phone I had a three page reply from him. There was no looking back from there.

Today, the word sustainability is used very loosely. Finding genuine partners and collaborators became my next path and that’s what drew me to RCGD. During the 2020 lockdown I was interviewed by Kestrel Jenkins of the podcast Conscious Chatter. The episode succeeding mine was with RCGD CEO, Samata Pattinson. After I started exploring the work, core foundation and ideology of the organisation, I remember saying to myself “God, I have to work with these folks!” The great thing about saying is that it brings you closer to believing and that in-turn helps manifesting the thought into reality. At the time I didn’t think of it this way but keep reading and you’ll see for yourself.

Sometime in July, I submitted my application for their Design Contest. Every single day after that I would go out in the night to the little balcony in my bedroom with my husband, stare at the night sky and say “ I’m going to win this… because I don’t think I’ll ever find an organisation like the RCGD” . This contest was, in my opinion, the most fair design competition because the textile options were provided by the organisers, therefore purely testing design prowess of applicants. In September, I received the phone call of my life – it was Samata Pattinson on the other end telling me I’d won!

So far, I’ve learnt that education, class, color can only slow you down till you allow them to. I, an Indian brown girl with a B.A (Hons) degree is going to Hollywood! And this has only happened because of two reasons. First – everyday that I work, I’m thinking of ways to create positive impacts in the lives of people I haven’t even met yet; and second – I never stopped believing in my work, not when I watched my peers earning twice as much as me, not when the people around me said big dreams are for those with big pockets, not even when the roof of the studio I was building collapsed in a cyclone. My love for the environment, my work, my family and my love for you – the friend I am yet to discover, is my superpower. What’s yours?

Sanah

Follow Sanah Sharma and visit her platform here.

Jasmine Rutherford’s Road To Sustainability

Sustainability means meeting our own needs without compromising the needs of future generations. Most people think of sustainability as just solar energy and recycling, but there is more to it. Growing up in a Caribbean household, we would always reuse plastic bags, glass jars and take-out containers. Cookie tins would house sewing materials and various small household items. Glass bottles would be cleaned and decorated to be used as décor around the house. At the time we didn’t realize these little actions were us actually exercising sustainable practices. Environmental sustainability doesn’t mean living without luxuries but rather being aware of your resource consumption and reducing unnecessary waste.

In my late teens, I began working at a high-end consignment shop. The experience of seeing luxury items being resold for lower prices and re-worn by other people changed my outlook on fashion as not being sustainable. From then, I began to look into more ways I could implement sustainability into my wardrobe. I took up thrifting and would scavenge through piles of clothes at Goodwill, Beacon’s Closet and Buffalo Exchange. I even would donate some items that I no longer wanted to these establishments. I took on DIY projects in which I would deconstruct some garments and make it into another piece. The volume of clothing Americans throw away each year has doubled in the last 20 years, from 7 million to 14 million tons. Most textiles take about 200 plus years to decompose. About 84% of clothing ends up in landfills or incinerators. In New York City alone, more than 400 million pounds of clothes are wasted each year. With such high numbers, sustainability within the fashion industry should be our top priority.

During my last year of college, sustainability became a more talked about conversation. We had whole entire portfolio projects dedicated to developing a sustainable collection. In my project, I designed a 20-look collection made entirely of cotton and denim. My focus was that these pieces were young, edgy, and wearable. When designing sustainably, I want people to feel comfortable with the clothing shown. I never want anyone to feel like they can’t participate in a sustainable lifestyle because of their financial class, size, race, etc. Designers like Eileen Fisher and Vivienne Westwood became huge inspirations to me at this time because of their eco-friendly activism. Eileen Fisher is working towards becoming a 100% sustainable business model while showcasing designs that are both timeless and comfortable. While Vivienne Westwood presents her ethical activism through strong messages in her collection. Seeing designers like Fisher and Westwood being able to create their designs freely whilst touching on environmental issues is inspiring.

Although, I learned a lot about sustainability in class I also learned a great deal from my friends. While working on projects during lab hours, I would watch as my friends cut fabric in an economical way. They would always make sure to use the least amount of fabric possible. Any leftover yardage would be used in another classes project or made into an accessory to compliment the piece. My friends and I would often share fabrications, not only to save money, but to cut back on waste. These moments shaped my design process and always remind me to be mindful of what I put out in the world. It has become instilled into me that as a designer, it is my responsibility to help change the way the industry is now.

Jasmine

Follow Jasmine Rutherford and visit her website, JasmineKelly.com.

Why we launched our app

Right now the fashion industry remains glued to its phone, and it wouldn’t be a stretch to say you can access a plethora of information about sustainability from the palm of your hand. The RCGD App offers an easy interface and exclusive window into the world of sustainability. It will also take our community into a conversation about sustainable fashion, keep them up to date with RGCD and our partners’ global initiatives about sustainability around the world, The RCGD App is a step in the direction of making sustainable fashion more accessible, and opening up the conversations around eco-design, sustainability for personal impact, sustainability education with a focus on solutions from personal tips to industry solutions.

It will provide a platform to connect with design talent around the globe and build a community dedicated to promoting and discussing sustainability. The app will feature original, never-seen-before content and the latest in RCGD’s work, in addition to industry news, bringing editorially-driven content right to users’ fingertips. Through its work, RCGD speaks to the global design community, designers – emerging and established, textile designers, garment technologists, retailers, stylists, fashion PR and the plethora of roles currently working in the global fashion industry. The RCGD App will provide a dynamic platform for these groups to come together for an educational, insightful and entertaining digital experience. The app will be an informative platform to demystify language around sustainability, provide inclusive content and include an engaged fashion community in dialogue, in both an insightful and educational way.

RCGD Launches Digital App

The RCGD App is a community focused mobile app that brings the topic of sustainable clothing and design to the hands of users around the world. A hub for key sustainable fashion topics such as intersectional environmentalism, social justice, circular and regenerative design, ethical design and much more. The app is a portal to eco-culture news and exclusive behind-the-scenes RCGD campaign activities.

The RCGD App is organized by a series of sustainably-relevant categories to help users remain informed on the latest sustainable fashion and eco-culture news. The new platform will provide insight into the complex and rewarding world of sustainability whilst offering an engaging community for members of the global fashion industry.

Educational, insightful and entertaining content will include:
Interviews with sustainability leaders and pioneers
Message corner with updates on relevant news from RCGD and partners
Features, blogs and editorials
Opportunity to chat with like-minded people
Sustainability tips and resources
Interaction with games to test knowledge
Announcements, calendar and event information
Interviews/regular content from RCGD partner

How to wash your clothes to combat water pollution

Microplastic pollution has been devastating our oceans for years and 80% of microplastics are made up of microfibres. The tiny fibres come from synthetic textiles like polyester, nylon, acrylic and spandex, and are shed during both domestic and industrial washing cycles. Research from the @uofcalifornia shows that a single synthetic textile can release up to 250,000 microfibers every time it’s washed.

The microfibre particles along with the washing machine grey waters are released into urban drainage, and up to 40% of them enter rivers, lakes and oceans. This is one of the major causes of marine pollution, as these fibres are readily consumed by fish and other aquatic wildlife, presenting grave threats to our beloved eco-system.

What can we do on our part? Resolving this problem is a lengthy process and spans across multiple sectors – from demanding textile manufacturers to create fabrics that shed less, to upgrading wastewater treatment plants, to installing special filters in washing machines to trap the fibres at their source. While resolutions may not occur overnight, we can all start somewhere. Apart from avoiding synthetic fabrics, one of the simplest solutions is to wash less. Washing less not only extends the lifecycle of the clothing or textile but also conserves water and energy use at our households.

Another great tip is to use a wash bag like @guppyfriend which filters out the tiniest microfibres released from the washing and retains them in the bag. Simply collect the fibres and dispose of them properly. We would love to hear your thoughts on any other solutions you could think of!

Washing your clothes properly

Are your jeans jaded? Do your shirts look a bit sad? It could be that you’re not washing them properly. According to research by LG, the average person will ruin £3,969 of clothes in a lifetime, which is why it’s important to learn to look after your washing.

TEST POST

Circular Economy Simplified!

What is the circular economy to you? In simple terms, a circular economy is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. The @EllenMacArthurFoundation defines a circular economy as one that is restorative and regenerative by design and is based on three principles:⠀⠀
1. Design out waste and pollution
2. Keep products and materials in use; and
3. Regenerate natural systems
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We hope this infographic helps to explain the principles in a simplified manner!

Must watch! Jarracharra: The Art of Country

Have you seen the trailer for the documentary ‘Jarracharra: The Art of Country’ yet? The documentary is currently a work in progress and tells the incredible story of how a group of remote Indigenous fashion enthusiasts from the Bábbarra Women’s Centre in Arnhem Land, a historical region in the Northern Territory of Australia, crowdfunded their way to Paris in 2019! While in Paris, they organised their own exhibition during Fashion Week, did a photoshoot with Vogue and met with major players in the world of fashion and art.

These Bábbarra artists came together in 1989 to create their own label, @BabbarraDesigns after procuring a post-war screen printing press. They specialise in fabrics and textiles that tell the ancestral stories of each artist’s local country and culture. Their success was relatively moderate for decades until their trip to Paris. What an incredible and inspiring journey! We can’t wait to see the full documentary, please see that the trailer can be viewed here.

Fashion & Climate Change: What impact do our clothes have? Food for thought series…

What is all of this talk about decarbonising the fashion industry about? Well, decarbonising refers to the process of reducing the amount of gaseous carbon compounds released in or as a result of (an environment or process), and right now it has been estimated that the fashion industry emitted around 2.1 billion tonnes of GHG emissions in 2018, equating to 4% of the global total? An emissions’ share that is larger than that of France, Germany & the UK combined! We know that greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane are being emitted throughout the fashion value chain, from agriculture and production to retail stores, and use and disposal of textiles.

Studies, including work carried out by the Global Fashion Agenda and McKinsey, have shown that some of the ways to reduce these emissions include at the upstream (production) end by shifting away from wet towards dry processing, transitioning from coal to electric energy, using less fertiliser (nitrogen linked GHG emissions) and pesticide (carbon) in cotton cultivation and introducing new more efficient technologies and equipment upgrades. From the upstream (consumer) end they include encouraging sustainable consumer behaviours including washing and drying clothing more efficiently, in addition to more circular clothing use models including renting, mending and customising garments, plus extending their use! Did you know that extending the life of clothing by an extra nine months of active use would reduce carbon, waste and water footprints by around 20-30% each of an item? This is the single most significant intervention in the lifecycle of clothing!

10 Trailblazing Young Environmentalists from Around the World

Autumn Peltier

One endless fountain of hope in sustainability is our youngest generation. In 2019, teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg took the world by storm through a scathing speech at the United Nations. Greta continued to make waves for her passionate environmentalist, ultimately being named Time Person of the Year. And while she’s the most famous young person of the movement, you’ll find other amazing kids and teenagers who are voices of change.

We want to honour some of these incredible young people by bringing awareness to who they are and their causes. Many other brave teens are fighting for change, so don’t let this list be the end of your rendezvous with young environmentalists!

1. Autumn Peltier (Canada)

A member of the Wiikwemkoong First Nation from Northern Ontario, 15-year-old Autumn Peltier is one of the most vibrant voices in clean water today. Peltier lives on Lake Huron, one of the Great Lakes of North America, and she considers herself lucky because she and her people always had access to clean water. She became an activist after learning of other indigenous communities who can’t drink their contaminated water. In the past few years, she’s met with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and even addressed world leaders at the UN General Assembly.

You can follow her here.

2. Mari Copeny (USA)

Known as “Little Miss Flint,” Mari Copeny is a 12-year-old native of Flint, Michigan. Since she was much younger, Copeny and her family have suffered the city’s ongoing water crisis. When she was 8, she sent a letter to then-President Barack Obama, demanding a government response. After declaring that “letters from kids like [Copeny] are what make me so optimistic about the future,” Obama headed to Flint in a visit that resulted in declaring a federal state of emergency, authorizing $100 million to fix the crisis. Copeny has continued to be one of the most recognizable faces in the fight towards improving Flint’s water crisis.

You can follow her here.

3. Xiye Bastida (Mexico-USA)

18-year-old Xiye Bastida was born in Atlacomulco, Mexico, and raised as part of the Otomi-Toltec indigenous group in San Pedro Tultepec until 2015. At that time, she and her family had to emigrate to the United States due to extreme climate conditions: their hometown was severely flooded after a three-year drought. She began her activism soon after moving to New York City. Bastida led her high school in a climate strike and spoke about Indigenous Cosmology in the United Nations’ World Urban Forum. Bastida currently sits on the administration committee of the People’s Climate Movement.

You can follow her here.

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The RCGD Surveys

For us at RCGD, cultural sustainability is the foundational element of sustainable development as it is intricately entwined with the social, environmental and economic spheres. At RCGD, we are very keen to understand your cultural references for sustainability and are happy to see this becoming a topic of greater significance in the industry. We have devised a single-question survey that we would love to share with our followers, Please click HERE  to redirect to submit your response!

Our other survey about global sustainability is also live, and thank you to all those who have already completed it. We are on the home stretch now and still gathering as many responses as we can. We would love for you to take a few moments to complete the survey if you haven’t already done so! A global lens has always been vital to us and now, more than ever, we want to make sure that our work speaks to all of you, where you are in the world. This survey will help us to do that, and do it in a way that makes our global community feel, and be, included. Please click HERE to redirect to the ‘Sustainable Fashion And Language Survey‘ (12 mins).

Thank you!

Cellulose & Cotton: Where do our clothes come from? Food for thought series…

Here are some things you might not know about where our clothes really come from…

To produce cotton, viscose and other natural fibres we are vastly altering habitats through agriculture.

Global deforestation contributes to 150 million trees logged per year to create the cellulose-based fabrics, such as viscose (and this figure is climbing). Derived from the wood pulp of fast-growing, this includes regenerative trees such as eucalyptus, beech and pine, as well as plants such as bamboo, soy, and sugar cane. When responsibly sourced, these materials provide a means to clothe the growing population sustainably. For example, Lenzing’s Tencel is known as a pioneer for manufacturing from the renewable raw material beech wood, sourced from sustainable forests in Austria and neighbouring countries. Fully integrated pulp and fiber production at the Lenzing site in Austria makes it possible to produce fibres in an eco-responsible way. However, when cellulose-based fabrics are harvested to extremes in other non-responsible ways, it can impact precious and critical ecosystems and biodiversity including the Amazon, especially when the pulp is sourced from endangered and ancient forests.

Cotton – is the most common natural material used in clothing and constitutes one-third of all textile fibres, and uses 2.4 per cent of the world’s cropland. Used to make Jersey Knit, Denim, Chino, Poplin it has currently damaged natural habitats by replacing indigenous vegetation through heavy monocultures and is responsible for full 16 per cent of the world’s insecticides and fertilisers. In the search for a method of farming that improves the resources it uses, rather than destroying or depleting them, there have been rising calls within the fashion industry for regenerative agriculture, which is a system of farming principles and practices that seeks to rehabilitate and enhance the entire ecosystem of the farm. It does this by placing a heavy premium on soil health with attention also paid to water management and fertilizer use, and other important considerations.

Happy New Year

Dear RCGD Family,

We wanted to wish our community a Happy New Year ahead. We also wanted to take a moment to appreciate the fact that we have all made it through one of the most challenging years of our lifetimes. We feel gratitude and humility in equal measure.

As an organisation, we want this new year to bring a renewed and intense focus on value and values. The fashion industry must move towards forming new, more respectful, load-sharing relationships with all of the people within its value cycle. It is time to commit to measuring progress and success with new people-centric metrics, specifically we are talking about the care economy, authentic representation, quality of the environment and the equitable distribution of revenue across the value cycle. It is time that we normalised an imperfect journey which includes sharing our vulnerabilities and failings. No one and no organisation is perfect, and so it is time that we started sharing the truth about the elements we have not mastered in this sustainable space, and not continue to only put a spotlight on the areas where we excel. It is time to be transparent about how we are trying to be better and where we are trying to get to.

It is time for considered conversations to give way to fast-paced action. The time for game plans from the bench is over. We have an opportunity to show up as more determined humankind, especially after the year that we have all had. We truly hope that we do this work, in 2021 and far beyond.

Suzy, Samata and Team RCGD

Back Once Again! RCGD Presents The Workshops

A journey into sustainable fashion through learning and understanding…

A series of workshops aimed at educating on the topic of sustainability. Curated for beginners, or those who are simply curious and ready to go on a journey of learning and understanding.

Back on Thursday 29th October 2020 after a successful launch on 8th October 2020, RCGD Presents The Workshops Episode 1 is back!

What to expect…

The Workshops will be hosted by RCGD CEO Samata with a range of guest appearances, including RCGD Founder Suzy Amis Cameron, covering key topics including:
Sustainable Design
Responsible Consumption
Fashion’s Impact on Nature
Intersectional Environmentalism – Human Rights & Social Justice
Communications Messaging & Terminology
Garment Care & End of Use
Sustainable Materials and Technologies
Size and Price Inclusivity – Size, Price, Category

Read more

Red Carpet Green Dress™ announces 2020 Global Design Contest winners

The RCGD Global Design Contest 2020, in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe, has awarded an exciting opportunity of a lifetime for two winners within the international fashion design community. Open to emerging and established designers over the age of 21, this year, applicants submitted a digital sketch of their sustainable red carpet design before the international contest closed on the 30th of July 2020. One gown and one suit design were selected by a judging panel which com-prised of Suzy Amis Cameron (Founder of Red Carpet Green Dress); Harold Weghorst (Vice President of Global Marketing & Branding at Lenzing AG); Nazma Akter (Founder and Executive Director of AWAJ Foundation) and Laura Basci (Founder of Laura Basci Couture).

Jasmine Kelly Rutherford and Sanah Sharma (L-R)

The two chosen designs by Sanah Sharma and Jasmine Kelly Rutherford will commence in early 2021 with sustainable eco-couture textiles from the recently announced RCGD X TENCEL™ Luxe collaboration. Two prominent VIPs from the fashion and entertainment industry will wear the designs. These RCGD ambassadors, to be announced, will be attending the 2021 Pre-Oscars Gala in the winners’ designs. Sanah and Jasmine’s work will also be presented to a global sus-tainable fashion and entertainment audience from across the globe. Alongside a monetary award of $1000 each, the winners will also receive a three-month business mentorship with CEO Samata Pattinson, and internship experience with couture designer Laura Basci in her LA-based atelier.

The campaign has directed funds towards two crucial organisations: Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh and The Fifth Pillar in Myanmar, as provision for the disproportionately vulnerable garment workers severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Samata, CEO of Red Carpet Green Dress, comments: “Announcing the winners brings back memories of when I was in their position, and won the contest back in 2011. It completely changed my life. The winners have such an incredible and exciting journey ahead of them. RCGD has been raising awareness of sustainability in the fashion industry for over a decade, changing people’s mindsets and creating a conversation about the issues and leading action. Sanah Sharma and Jasmine Kelly Rutherford will not only dress ambassadors but will receive first-hand experience and mentorship. I am grateful to be a part of the journey they will be embarking on.”

This years winning gown has a zero-waste design plan. Designer Sanah Sharma graduated from the Pearl Academy in 2015 with a BA in Fashion Design before launching her namesake label. She is the recipient of numerous design accolades across Asia and authored a chapter in the eco-handbook ‘Models for Sustainable Framework in Luxury Fashion: Luxury and Models’, published by Springer Publications in 2018.

Sanah Sharma comments: “Fashion is among the most environmentally destructive industries on the planet owing to the primarily linear supply chain that has become the global industry’s standard. Every second, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles are landfilled or incinerated. Most of these comprise synthetic fibres produced from non-renewable resources like oil, releasing millions of tons of greenhouse gases into the environment. While sustainable materials have existed in the past, we have not seen luxury evening wear textiles developed with high sustainability indices. To make fashion circular, we must revolutionise its primal resource, textile. This is where materials like cellulose-based RCGD X TENCEL™ Luxe can help close the gap.”

Harold Weghorst, Vice President of Global Marketing & Branding at Lenzing AG, comments: “Sanah’s dress is a perfect symbiosis of fashion and sustainability. The elegance of the design and the smart concept of zero-waste makes Sanah the deserved winner of this contest.”

The winner of the 2020 suit design is Jasmine Kelly Rutherford. A recent graduate from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. Jasmine’s past roles include stints at Kendall + Kylie, and Cinq à Sept. She has worked at Nordstrom Inc since 2012. Her tailored design will be created ex-clusively using an RCGD x TENCEL™ Luxe cashmere fusion fabric that is lightweight and strong enough to hold pleats and smocking.

Jasmine Kelly Rutherford comments: “Having a textile that is both sustainable and long-wearing is a huge asset. I always try to design with the wearer in mind; I want the client to be comfortable and not feel like they are wearing something confining. While wearing my design, I want them to not only look luxurious but feel it too. Winning the RCGD global design contest is beyond exciting because I believe that sustainability is becoming increasingly important in the fashion industry. As I create, I want my designs to not only tell a story but to have a voice and speak on issues that affect us around the world.”

Vice President of Global Marketing & Branding at Lenzing AG, comments: “Jasmine’s suit is a strong statement of how fashion serves people and planet and not the other way around. A suit that makes the wearer feel comfortable, confident, and conscious of doing the right thing.”

EDITORS NOTES:

The Contest Winners’ designs will be produced and worn at the Red Carpet Red Dress Pre-Oscars Gala in 2021.
Each look will be created using RCGD X TENCEL™ Luxe fabrications.
The two winners are available for interview on special request.
Further commentary available from Samata, CEO of Red Carpet Green Dress, and Harold Weghorst, Vice President of Global Marketing & Branding at Lenzing AG.

For more information and imagery, please contact Lois@In-Addition.com

Thank you to all of our entrants, we have something special lined up for those who entered but did not win, so please stay tuned! 

SEE WWD PRESS BREAK.

RCGD Presents The Workshops

A journey into sustainable fashion through learning and understanding…

A series of workshops aimed at educating on the topic of sustainability. Curated for beginners, or those who are simply curious and ready to go on a journey of learning and understanding.

Launching on Thursday 8th October 2020
What to expect…

The Workshops will be hosted by RCGD CEO Samata with a range of guest appearances, including RCGD Founder Suzy Amis Cameron, covering key topics including:
Sustainable Design
Responsible Consumption
Fashion’s Impact on Nature
Intersectional Environmentalism – Human Rights & Social Justice
Communications Messaging & Terminology
Garment Care & End of Use
Sustainable Materials and Technologies
Size and Price Inclusivity – Size, Price, Category

Read more

One Word Cultural Sustainability Survey

For RCGD, cultural sustainability is the foundational element of sustainable development as it is intricately entwined with the social, environmental and economic spheres. At RCGD, we are very keen to understand your cultural references for sustainability and are happy to see this becoming a topic of greater significance in the industry. We have devised a single-question survey that we would love to share with our followers. Please click HERE  to redirect to submit your response!

 

Message From Our Founder

Words from Suzy Amis Cameron…

Placeholder text here:

Summertime – a moment of pause, reflection, travel and raucous family reunions; at least that’s what it meant to me in years past.  Most of us are wearing facemasks to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19 when we are brave enough to venture outside our homes.  We are picking up signs, protesting in the street for our friends and neighbors – seeking change.  We are a planet of tremendous souls that have experienced grief, fear, loss and so many other emotions and pains throughout the last few months. It makes you wonder, what will summer bring?

In closing, I’m taking a moment to reflect and plan ahead for a better future for our children. I extend my gratitude to those working tirelessly everyday during this pandemic. We would not have made the recoveries, had the ability to purchase groceries, or order our online purchases if it weren’t for those hard workers that showed up every day for us. Thank you. For those who have stood by their fellow American in the midst of COVID-19, you are admired and respected.

Sincerely,
Suzy

Fashion’s Textile Waste Problem

Proper waste management is of the most primordial stepping stones into a more conscious, regenerative lifestyle. It’s a well-known fact that the average individual generates tons of waste every year as the result of day-to-day living, most of which ends up in landfills or polluting our oceans and islands. And while we all need to step up and do everything we can to decrease our negative impact, it amounts to little if the world’s largest companies are generating an individual’s yearly quota every second. Unfortunately, one of the world’s leading generators of waste is the textile industry. And as EDGE reports, if it weren’t for the existence of oil, the fashion would be the largest polluter in the world.

Over the past 15 years, fashion production has doubled while the amount of time our clothes occupy in our wardrobes has significantly decreased. Entirely suitable and wearable garments end up thrown away and burned in landfills when they could easily be passed on or repurposed. Mass-produced garments which are not made to last, known as design obsolescence, coupled with our mental bombardment by a dangerous notion that our wardrobe needs to change entirely every few months, has brought us to where we are. Fast fashion has gone from releasing four seasons in a year to up to 10 collections (or more) over the past decade. This leads to two major and connected issues – more shopping, and less time for pieces to be in style. Between items that go unsold and the toxic disposal-focused culture, textiles have become huge components of landfills everywhere. The USA alone had generated up to 32.44 billion pounds of textile waste by 2014 by EPA estimates, and surely the numbers are much higher six years later. In all, textile waste makes up about 9.5% of America’s yearly municipal waste.

It’s been a growing concern for the past decade, as fashion lines have increased yearly production. The entire process is damaging on multiple levels, creating systematically unfair practices and a dismal situation for Earth’s health. It’s not just bad for people and our planet: waste isn’t even an economically sound practice. The industry misses about $560 billion in value due to the limited lifespan of the textiles we so heavily rely on.

Read more

The magnitude of damage caused by toxic chemicals in fast fashion

The magnitude of damage caused by toxic chemicals in fast fashion is shocking!

There are four distinct pillars hugely affected: Consumers, Garment Workers, the Community living around the manufacturing facilities, and the Environment that we all live in. Regulating this space is complex and varies from country to country. It’s not uncommon for some toxic chemicals to go totally unregulated!⁣ As consumers, we can often feel powerless in this situation but the smallest of actions do play a part. Researching brands before purchasing, buying second hand or vintage, and reducing our overall consumption all help. In an interview with goop, eco-fashion advocate Marci Zaroff said that the worst and most hazardous chemicals are used in conventional textiles, so buying certified GOTS, Cradle to Cradle, and/or OEKO-TEX are the best ways to take action. Another tip she suggests is to encourage our favourite brands and retailers to build chemical reduction strategies, especially in their dyeing and processing supply chains. ⁣

Any other pointers worth raising? We would love to hear our community’s thoughts on this.⁣

Six Sins of Greenwashing

Twelve years ago, TerraChoice released a report entitled ‘Six Sins of Greenwashing’ which surveyed the North American consumer markets and delved more into false or misleading green marketing claims. The report concluded that greenwashing is pervasive, and came up with six key sins of greenwashing to be wary of. With the recent surge of environmental and sustainability awareness across the globe, this report seems more relevant now than ever. ⁣

Community, we urge you to do your research and investigate clothing brands before purchasing from them. There are many resources out there to help you avoid labels that may be greenwashing. We highly recommend the @goodonyou_app, an excellent resource for trusted brand ratings, articles and expertise on ethical and sustainable fashion. Tag below any others you know of as well! ⁣

Biodegradability of fabrics

In the 2015 fashion documentary ‘True Cost’, it was reported that a staggering 80 billion pieces of clothing are consumed each year, but only 10% of them are donated to charity or thrift stores. The remaining 90% ends up in landfills as textile waste! Well, how can we avoid textile waste? One option is to extend the lifecycle of our clothing by up-cycling or repurposing them, and the other option is to decompose some of our clothing!  Textiles made from natural fibres can be composted and returned to earth. We’ve put together a little infographic on the biodegradability of the fabrics to help you along the next time you do a spring clean of your wardrobe. Some of your clothes can go straight back into the soil. Take a look below…

5 Free Online Courses to Learn About Sustainability in Fashion and Beyond

Millions of people around the world are stuck inside their houses, and boredom has been taking hold of many people over the past weeks. For those of us fortunate enough to stay at home, the days might feel a little endless, with not much to do. As we wait for the outside to become safer again, this is a great time to turn our attention to learning things. Thinking of the people who can’t go out and don’t have a lot to do right now, we’ve curated a list of great (and free!) online courses related to environmentalism and sustainable design.

Isolation can be difficult. The considerable decrease in social interaction and outdoor activities can make anyone anxious and feeling on edge. Keeping one’s mind occupied is a great way to pass the time during these strange days. We can’t think of a better way to exercise the brain than learning about the driving force behind Red Carpet Green Dress: sustainability. The courses below revolve around creating a more conscious future for our planet and viewing different perspectives on sustainable practices. We hope you enjoy them!

1. UCLA – Sustainable Living
Designed, developed, and facilitated by UCLA students, the Sustainable Living course online is a sub-division of the Education for Sustainable Living Program (ESLP). The series compiles talks from speakers from the university and several other institutions to talk about the layers of sustainability. Here, you’ll hear about the practices of conscious living from experts, activists, professors, community activists, reps from environmental NGOs, and even government officials. The topics are as varied as green businesses, environmental justice, food systems, organic gardens, transportations, and the green economy in general, and it serves as a great introduction to this vast world.

2. London College of Fashion – Fashion, and Sustainability: Understanding Luxury Fashion in a Changing World
The London College of Fashion has housed the Centre for Sustainable Fashion research facility since 2008. For years, this institution has focused on creating knowledge to make our industry more sustainable. Their Fashion and Sustainability free course, aimed at fashion workers and educators, serves as an introduction to sustainable fashion, and its potential impact. Educators from the Centre for Sustainable Fashion teach this six-week course. In this time, they explore the reasoning behind sustainable fashion, the critical issues within the industry, the agendas at play, and the contexts associated with luxury fashion. Kering, Kering, the luxury fashion group behind brands like Gucci, Balenciaga, and Yves Saint Laurent, supports this series of lectures.

3. The University of Exeter – Who Made My Clothes?
Created in conjunction with the not-for-profit global movement Fashion Revolution, this 3-week course serves as a first contact with how the fashion industry looks behind the scenes. Students can learn about the practices of the fashion industry and how supply chains work, along with their cost in the economy and the lives of workers. It’s also an excellent tool to learn how to research brands and engaging in a safer and more conscious supply chain. It is an excellent place to begin that journey if you’re looking for a guide on how to become a more conscious buyer.

4. Columbia University – The Age of Sustainable Development
A 14-week course taught by world-renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs, it is based on his 2015 book of the same name. It’s an in-depth view of the meaning of sustainable development, and the current challenges its practices face. The Columbia professor teaches course students about the history of economic growth from the Industrial Revolution onwards, and how inequality has looked like at different times. He also delves into the various scenarios that need to be taken into account for sustainable development, including social justice, urbanisation, climate change, biodiversity, and more. In all, these lessons offer a comprehensive look from someone who has been researching this topic in the world stage for many years.

5. The Canopy Lab – Sustainability for Youth
The Canopy Lab is a Danish company that’s been looking to change the way people learn since 2015. Their Sustainability for Youth course has several speakers from different areas and experiences sharing their journeys in sustainability, from day-to-day practices like reducing waste to entrepreneurs creating projects entirely based on organic materials.

Awaj Foundation Campaign Message

AWAJ FOUNDATION

Our Workers

Supported by the Conscious Fashion Campaign in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships, the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe will be directing a percentage of funds raised towards two crucial organizations: Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh and The Fifth Pillar (in cooperation with Fair Wear) in Myanmar, as provision for the disproportionately vulnerable garment workers severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through its projects, services, research and advocacy, the Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh aims to empower workers and enable harmonious industrial relations. Awaj Foundation particularly focuses on supporting women workers, because they believe that leadership from women can transform society towards greater equity and justice. Awaj Foundation are also working to establish a decent and living wage for garment workers in Bangladesh.  As a grassroots organization with an extensive network among garment workers and their families, Awaj Foundation are witnessing first-hand the devastating impact the pandemic is having on workers. Many members have reported that their factories have been shut down indefinitely and workers were given only 23 days of salary as severance. Some factories have closed without giving any payments to workers at all.

All the sectors of business in Bangladesh are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, but the garment industry is terribly affected, especially the garment workers who are now facing mounting problems. There are 4.5 million garment workers in Bangladesh’s garment and textile industry, of whom 65% are women. These women all face separate challenges, some having internally migrated from different parts of the countryside to industrial cities, often sending money back to their families. Some of the women workers are single mothers, divorced, widowed or simply living far away from their families.

During COVID-19 approximately more than 30,000 workers have already lost their jobs due to the reduction in production work and countless international business orders being cancelled. As a result,  a high number of workers have not been paid their workers wage for the month of March. It has recently been decided, after numerous meetings and collective negotiations with labour leaders that 65% of wages workers will be paid for the month of April (although 100% of wage remuneration was being sought). For the months of March and April, factories heavily laid off their workforce, and those workers specifically will only receive half of their basic wage and full house rent as per Bangladesh Labour Law. This leaves many workers receiving less than the minimum wages and struggling to meet their basic needs for themselves and their families. If this situation continues, the repercussions will be devastating. In this intrepid situation, it will be nearly impossible for these garment workers to secure new  jobs due to COVID-19 and its impact. Still, some factories have already reopened despite the pandemic threat, without the maintenance of social distancing rules despite WHO guidelines. Workers will undoubtedly return to work, faced with potential job loss. Sadly, unemployment remains their greatest fear, even more than being infected with COVID-19. Read more

RCGD partners with Tencel™ Luxe to launch global sustainable design contest opportunity for design community and raise funds for garment workers impacted by Covid-19

May 12, 2020 (LOS ANGELES) – Red Carpet Green Dress™ is launching the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe. 

Founded by leading environmentalist Suzy Amis Cameron, the international design contest is open to anyone over the age of 21. Talented and serious designers, whether they are emerging or established professionals, from all over the world are welcome to enter. The designers can submit their application through rcgdglobal.com, from May 12th – July 30th. The winners will be selected in late August by an international panel of sustainable fashion experts. The winning designers will get the opportunity to dress prominent influencers in the fashion and entertainment industry for an exciting red carpet moment and present their work to an audience of eco-influencers in LA at the RCGD Gala, along with a monetary award, and business mentorship and more. 

Supported by the Conscious Fashion Campaign in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships, the campaign and contest will be directing a percentage of funds raised towards two crucial organizations: Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh and The Fifth Pillar (in cooperation with Fair Wear) in Myanmar, as provision for disproportionately vulnerable garment workers severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

At RCGD, we believe this is an important time for our sustainable design contest, which champions a message of hope and opportunity, particularly when spirits are so low. When Suzy Amis Cameron started the initiative in 2009, her motivations were to create opportunities and visibility for fashion designers and to fundraise for environmental or socially responsible causes. We could not think of a more relevant time to step up for both of those reasons, over 10 years later. We are excited to partner with TENCEL™ Luxe and put the crucial spotlight on emerging design talent, and at the same time the incredible work our allies at Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh and The Fifth Pillar in Myanmar are doing to support garment workers right now,” said Samata Pattinson, CEO of Red Carpet Green Dress™.

For decades, sustainability has always been sidelined in eco-couture. Through our partnership with Red Carpet Green Dress™, we are able to put the spotlight on sustainability on the red carpet. We are thrilled to join hands with Red Carpet Green Dress™ in the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 and together, we will take a greater stride forward to build a more sustainable industry ecosystem. We look forward to seeing many creative eco-couture entries and inspire designers all over the world to support us in driving sustainability in the fashion industry,” said Harold Weghorst, Vice President of Global MARKETING, Lenzing AG.

Red Carpet Green Dress™ shares our vision in impacting positive change within the fashion industry. Working hand in hand with the United Nations Office for Partnerships we aim to support meaningful multi-stakeholder collaborations which secure a future where no one is left behind. RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 is the epitome of aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals as a roadmap to recovery in these unprecedented times to shape the future of fashion. Empowering next generation talent along with supporting women garment workers is a catalyst to commitment towards dynamic and lasting change,” said Kerry Bannigan, Founder Conscious Fashion Campaign in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships

Red Carpet Green Dress™ was conceived in response to the growing need for sustainable fashion. When faced with the lack of ethical fashion choices whilst attending global premieres of husband James Camerons’ ‘Avatar’, campaign founder Suzy Amis Cameron decided that it was time for a change. She created a design contest which challenged emerging and established designers across the globe to create sustainable Oscar-worthy gowns, thus fulfilling the Green Dress criteria to serve the obvious need for more sustainability in the industry. During this current pandemic so many have lost their jobs including garment workers. By directing a percentage of funds raised through entries – there is a nominal $30 entry fee  – and direct contributions from RCGD and partners to the Awaj Foundation and The Fifth Pillar (in cooperation with Fair Wear), they aim to step up for these workers and create opportunities for the global design community at the same time. RCGD will be also providing face masks to the garment workers, many of whom are either being forced back to factory work prematurely or are in precarious and vulnerable positions. 

The Prize

Winning designers will be announced in late August. 

The prize includes: 

  • The opportunity to dress prominent influencers in the fashion and entertainment industry for a red carpet moment. The unveiling event(s) will be announced at a later date. 
  • Present your work to an audience of eco-influencers in LA along
  • A monetary award of $1,000
  • Business mentorships with Laura Basci and RCGD CEO Samata
  • An invitation to join the Red Carpet Green Dress™ Oscars Gala in Los Angeles

The Judges: 

  • Suzy Cameron, Founder – A noted environmental leader, business pioneer, mom of five and new grandma, Suzy Amis Cameron is committed to caring for our wild, living Earth, with an emphasis on plant-based food  to address climate change. In 2009, she launched Red Carpet Green Dress™, a global sustainable fashion campaign showcasing environmentally responsible fashions on the red carpet in partnership with The Oscars. RCGD also co-creates sustainable garments with luxury international fashion brands.
  • Nazma Akter – The founder and Executive Director of Awaj Foundation. Nazma has been fighting to improve workers’ rights, especially women workers, in the garment sector in Bangladesh for over 32 years. Nazma is also the President of Sommilito Garments Sramik Federation, one of the largest union federations in Bangladesh, and co-chair of Asia Pacific Women’s Committee of IndustriALL Global Union.
  • Laura Basci –  Swiss fashion designer and haute couture tailor based in Los Angeles. She delivers flawless fits for celebrities for countless award shows, red carpet events, video & photo shoots and TV & movie productions. Top designers, stylists and celebrities have made Laura Basci one of the most in demand names for haute couture tailoring and fashion design in Los Angeles and the rest of the world. 
  • Harold Weghorst – Vice President of Global Brand Management at Lenzing AG. A veteran in the global branding and marketing sector, Weghorst has been driving the leading cellulose fibers company’s transformation from a B2B company to a B2B2C company since June 2016, whilst heading the company’s international marketing efforts.

Find out more and enter the contest here.

‘Our Workers’ Doe Lote Thar – The Fifth Pillar Campaign Message

THE FIFTH PILLAR

Doe Lote Thar means ‘Our Workers’ in Myanmar language

Supported by the Conscious Fashion Campaign in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships, the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe will be directing a percentage of funds raised towards two crucial organizations: Awaj Foundation in Bangladesh and The Fifth Pillar (in cooperation with Fair Wear) in Myanmar, as provision for the disproportionately vulnerable garment workers severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Fifth Pillar (TFP), a registered local organization of human rights lawyers, will work in cooperation with Fair Wear to manage the funds raised. The Fifth Pillar is a rights and legal based NGO with a mission of strengthening democratic institutions in Myanmar, which has a strong network with the trade unions, labour organizations, and a payment system  to ensure safe fund distribution. Multi stakeholder initiative Fair Wear works with 130 member brands who are committed to finding a fairer way to making clothes, and engage directly with factories, trade unions, NGOs and governments to find answers to problems which others think are unsolvable. Myanmar’s garment industry employs nearly 400,000 workers, of which 90% are (typically young) women.

Read more

RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe: Terms & Conditions

RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe Terms & Conditions

These Terms and Conditions apply to all RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe.

By registering at https://www.rcgdglobal.com/design-contest-2020 registrants, specifically agree to being contacted by email, text and phone for matters regarding their entry, deadlines, payments and competition news. Registrants may unsubscribe at any time by emailing info@rcgdglobal.com. This will also remove all registration data from the entry system and the Red Carpet Green Dress website. The entrant’s completed registration application and fee payment constitutes confirmation that they have read, understood and agreed to the following General Terms and Conditions.

1. OWNERSHIP
The RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe is a global design competition, related events and media. The organizer is Red Carpet Green Dress LLC (also known as RCGD), which is incorporated in the State of California. Questions in all matters should be referred directly to Red Carpet Green Dress at info@rcgdglobal.com. Further contact details available upon request.

TERMS OF USE
All copyrighted images, trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on the Red Carpet Green Dress website are the property of their respective rights-holders and owners, and used on this website for reference purposes only.

2. ELIGIBILITY & ENTRY
The RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe is open globally to designers, firms, practices, agencies, organizations, schools, businesses, students and non-professionals. The RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe launches on 12th May 2020. Each entrant may enter as many unique and original designs as they wish, upon completion of registration and payment of appropriate fee(s). Entries may be submitted by individuals, companies, organizations, teams, or by teachers for classroom projects. Entrants must be at least twenty-one (21) years of age to enter as an individual.

The entry fee of $30 is in effect at the time of registration. Entrant’s payment, fully completed registration form, sketched design and supporting documents must be received by the competition’s published closing date, the 30th July 2020. In order to make a valid entry into a Competition you must enter as an individual using your legal name and make only one entry per Competition, unless the Specific Rules allow you to make multiple entries.

No multiple, bulk, automated, machine assisted, third party, syndicate or other group entries will be accepted. We shall disqualify any entries which, in our reasonable opinion, appear to have used any of these entry methods including multiple entries from the same IP address or telephone number, unless the Specific Rules state that multiple entries are permitted. We may ask you to provide us with proof of your eligibility to enter a Competition and we reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to decide whether or not eligibility criteria have been met. Breach of any of the criteria contained in this Clause 2 may result in your disqualification from a Competition and/or the withdrawal of a Prize.

3. DELIVERY AND COLLECTION OF ENTRIES
No physical competition entries or materials will be accepted. We are keen to be as sustainable as possible. As a result, we solely use an online-only judging process and cannot accept printed entries. No garments will be created apart from the winning designs, so no entries featuring photos of completed garments are allowed. We aim both to reduce waste and avoid participation in its creation. No garments will therefore be created apart from the winning designs. Additionally, mailing garments around the world creates more environmental footprints and handling. It is also currently unsafe. The contest is solely an online and virtual contest, all operated through www.rcgdglobal.com.

4. JUDGING
A multi-disciplinary jury of experts is selected by the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe. This jury will choose two winning designers. The judge’s decision process is private and completely confidential. The decision of our judges is final and conclusive in all circumstances and no correspondence will be entered into.

5. PRIZE & OFFICIAL WINNER BENEFITS
Exciting prize details for two lucky winners!
*$1000 cash prize
*Dress contest ambassadors
*Attend RCGD Gala in LA as VIP Guest with travel, accommodation and living expenses covered
*Exhibition of winning designs at RCGD Gala and presentation to audience
*Meet Red Carpet Green Dress founder Suzy Amis Cameron
*Internship experience with couture designer Laura Basci in her LA-based atelier
*Business mentorship with RCGD CEO Samata
*Media coverage
** Please note that this Red Carpet Green Dress contest is not in partnership with The Annual Academy Awards **

We reserve the right, at our absolute discretion, to request certain evidence relating to your contest entry including proof of identity, age and address. All Prizes are non-transferable and may not be given, assigned or sold to another person. Prizes cannot be exchanged for cash or other alternatives, except by us in accordance with clause 13.1. Where the Prize contains ticket(s) to an event, you will be bound by and must comply with the event promoter’s terms and conditions together with those set out on the ticket and the rules and regulations of the venue.

You may not commit us to any contract, expense or cost without our prior written consent. You must have sufficient financial resources to meet any financial commitment which you may incur in connection with the Prize beyond those included in the Prize itself (including transfers to and from the airport, meals and drinks). We accept no liability for any changes in the details, including dates and times, of any flights, other transport, airport details, accommodation or other aspects of the Prize. You will be responsible for any inoculation and other health or visa requirements for your destination.

Your entry or participation in a Competition and/or Prize is at your own risk and your health and safety is your own responsibility. If the Competition or Prize requires you to undertake any physical activity please ensure, before entering the Competition, that you (i) are in good health and (ii) have no underlying medical condition and are taking no medication that could adversely affect you. Please ensure that you notify us immediately if you become ill or become aware of any other relevant medical or health and safety information which could affect your participation in a Competition and/or Prize. You must comply with all safety requests made by us or our representatives.

You must hold a valid passport with at least 3 months’ further duration and which contains no visa restrictions on your ability to travel to the relevant destination. Passport control and in-country authorities reserve the right to refuse entry. If you are refused passage and or entry/exit to or from the country being visited, any additional costs and losses incurred will be your sole responsibility. You must comply with the terms and conditions, including health and safety requirements, of the Prize provider, the airline and other carriers and venues involved in the Competition or the Prize including all health and safety guidelines and instructions and all applicable legal and regulatory requirements.

6. PUBLICITY
By entering your work in this competition, you and your company or organization grant consent and license to RCGD for the use of your name, design and representations of your design in any media, anywhere in the world, without compensation or credit, for RCGD promotional and editorial reasons only.

7. PROPRIETARY RIGHTS
By entering a Competition or submitting images or any other materials in relation to a Competition or Prize you: (i) confirm the grant by you to us of a worldwide, perpetual, royalty free licence in the Intellectual Property Rights in the Products or Competition entry, (ii) waive any moral rights and like rights you have in relation to the Products or Competition entry so that we shall be entitled to use the Products or Competition entry in any and all media at no cost to us and (iii) warrant to us that the Products or Competition entry:
– are personal and related specifically to you;
– are owned and controlled by you and that you have the right, power and authority to grant the rights set out in these Terms;
– will not infringe the Intellectual Property Rights, privacy or any other rights of any third party;
– will not contain anything which is untrue, defamatory, obscene, indecent, harassing or threatening;
– do not violate any applicable law or regulation (including any laws regarding anti-discrimination or false advertising);
– are not obscene or pornographic;
– do not, to the best of the your knowledge, contain any viruses or other computer programming routines that are intended to damage, detrimentally interfere with, surreptitiously intercept or expropriate any system, data or personal information;
– are free from any encumbrances such that we may use the Products in accordance with and in the manner set out in these Terms.

For the avoidance of doubt, all rights relating to the Competition (including the name, title and format of the Competition) will vest exclusively in RCGD for our own use (in our absolute discretion). Any personal data submitted by you will be used solely in accordance with current data protection legislation and our privacy policy .

By entering this competition, you/your company affirm that your entry is original and does not infringe upon the rights of any person or entity. You acknowledge that you own, are solely responsible or otherwise control all of the rights to the content or entries that you submit; that use of the content or entries you supply does not violate these Terms of Use and will not cause injury to any person or entity. You agree you will not by any act or omission do anything, which might bring Red Carpet Green Dress into disrepute or affect the reputation of the Competition or company itself.

Entrants will indemnify the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe or its affiliates against all costs, losses, damages, expenses and liabilities (including for loss of reputation and goodwill and professional advisors fees) suffered by us arising as a result of a breach by you of your obligations under the Terms or in any way in connection with your failure to follow our reasonable instructions with regard to your entry into the Competition or taking of any Prize.

The RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe are not liable for any copyright or trademark infringement on the part of the entrant. Contest entrants are advised and required to obtain third party consents where required by law or by best ethical practices.

8. OWNERSHIP OF WORKS
Entrants own the I.P. rights to the original design sketches they submit to the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe competitions. RCGD does not own the original I.P. rights or works entered into the competitions, but has a royalty-free, perpetual right to use that work in connection with publicity and promotion of RCGD programs.

Red Carpet Green Dress owns the contest text entries with regards to the contest creative challenge answers found on page 2 of the entry form. Red Carpet Green Dress are able to use said text and information for their own purposes such as market research or promotional materials. RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 sponsors or partners (Businesses and Organizations) do not own design entries, original research, or design materials that they sponsor unless a written license or other transfer of rights in those works is executed by the author(s) and acknowledged in writing by all parties, including RCGD.

9. PRIVACY
You agree to keep confidential any information which you know or reasonably ought to know is confidential and relates to us, our business or the Competition or Prize. You agree to participate, at our request, in publicity (including interviews). We may refer to your association with the Competition and/or the Prize in all publicity, marketing and materials.

10. DISCLAIMER
By entering the RCGD Global Design Contest 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe Competition, participants release the RCGD sponsors, Jury participants and their respective affiliates, agents, directors, officers, employees, volunteers, families and shareholders from all liability of any kind relating to these competitions.

11. DISQUALIFICATION
We reserve the right (without accepting any liability or giving you any compensation) to disqualify you from a Competition and/or withhold or withdraw a Prize (or seek compensation from you therefore) if (in our opinion, which shall be final):
you are in breach of the Terms or any of your obligations, representations and/or warranties under this Agreement;
– your conduct is inappropriate or contrary to the spirit or intention of the Terms or of the Competition;
– you have committed or undertaken any fraud, dishonesty, deceit, misconduct or similar action including providing any false or incorrect information;
– your act(s) or omission(s) might have an adverse effect on the Competition and partners
– it is in our best interests to do so.

We reserve the right to disqualify you from the Competition and/or Prize (without liability or compensation) if you (in our opinion, which shall be final) conduct yourself in a way which exposes you or others to any medical, security, safety or other risk whatsoever (including being intoxicated or abusive in any way). Entries that are incomplete, indecipherable, corrupt, late or otherwise not in accordance with entry instructions will not be accepted. In the event of your disqualification from the Competition/Prize:
We reserve the right to select another Entrant to take part in the Competition/receive the Prize; and you may be required to pay any costs incurred.

12.DISPUTES
The liability of RCGD to the Entrant, whether said liability stems from any breach of contract or duty, for any damages, costs, loss of goodwill or financial income suffered by the Entrant, will be limited to the entrant’s paid fees. These rules will be governed by the laws of the State of California, without regard to California’s conflicts of law principles. The legal relationships shall be governed exclusively by United States law. This shall also apply when the entrant or any RCGD event is located outside the USA. Any dispute relating to the competitions or related events and media or these rules will be resolved by arbitration in California in accordance with the commercial arbitration rules of the CPR Institute for Dispute Resolution. Should any of the above provisions be rendered ineffective in whole or in part, all other provisions shall remain effective. Terms that differ from these Terms and Conditions shall not apply unless the RCGD Administrator has given specific written consent. All published data subject to change

13. CANCELLATION
13.1 We shall be entitled, in our reasonable discretion, to cancel, delay and/or recommence a Competition with immediate effect by on-air or online announcement without any liability to you. If we cancel a Competition after you have claimed a Prize, we will use our reasonable endeavours to offer you an alternative Prize. If we offer you an alternative Prize but you do not accept it, you shall have no claim against us.
13.2 We may cancel a Competition if we believe we have good reason to do so, including if
13.3 there have been any errors in the preparation for, or the conduct of, the Competition materially affecting the result of the Competition, the number of Prize claims or the value of the Prize claims.

14. EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY/INDEMNITY
14.1 Nothing in the Terms excludes our liability for:
14.1.1 death or personal injury arising out of our negligence or the negligence of our employees; (Clause)
14.1.2 fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation by us or our employees; or
14.1.3 any other liability that cannot be excluded or limited by law.
14.2 Without prejudice to the provisions of Clause 14.1, we exclude all liability whatsoever for any costs, expenses, losses, damages, liabilities, injury or disappointment (other than any costs and expenses specifically provided for in the Competition and/or Prize) including any loss of profit, business, contracts, revenues or anticipated savings and whether special, direct, indirect or consequential suffered by you howsoever arising in connection with the Competition and/or Prize.
14.3 Without prejudice to the provisions of Clause 14.1 and subject to the provisions of Clause 14.2, we shall have no liability whatsoever:
– in the event of online entries delayed or not received by us as a result of network incompatibility, technical faults or for any other reason;
– for any person not being able to enter a Competition for any reason, including system failure, error, the application through which online entries are made being down, hacks on the system or personal computer issues;
– for any losses suffered by you in submitting data to any of our websites

15. FORCE MAJEURE
RCGD shall not be liable to perform any of our obligations under the Competition or in respect of the Prizes where we are unable to do so as a result of unforeseen circumstances or circumstances beyond our reasonable control and whilst we may (but shall not be obliged to) endeavour to provide an alternative Prize of equal value, we shall not be liable to compensate you in such circumstances.

Got 4 mins?

RCGD has worked with brands and talent from around the world, so a global lens has always been important to us

We recently worked out that our campaign has collaborated with designers and film talent from over 20 countries! Now, more than ever, we want to make sure that our work speaks to all of you, where you are in the world. This survey will help us to do that, and do it in a way that makes our global community feel, and be, included. We would appreciate your participation in this short survey to help us along our way!

Thank you for your time!

Global RCGD 2020 Survey

Red Carpet Green Dress is on a mission to make sustainable fashion more inclusive

RCGD has worked with brands and talent from around the world, so a global lens has always been important to us. We recently worked out that our campaign has collaborated with designers and film talent from over 20 countries (take a look below)! Now, more than ever, we want to make sure that our work speaks to all of you, where you are in the world. This survey will help us to do that, and do it in a way that makes our global community feel, and be, included.

We would appreciate your participation in this short survey to help us along our way!

Thank you.

A Short Guide on How to Green Your Wardrobe This Spring

As the COVID-19 situation unfolds outside, times are more proving testing for millions of restless people sitting at home. In response, many are starting to take on new hobbies, and get creative during quarantine. Whilst being able to stay safely at home and even get bored is a privilege, if you have the time, why not use it to green your wardrobe and organise your way into a more sustainable lifestyle? After all, it’s spring in the northern hemisphere which is traditionally the best time for cleaning.

Here are a few reasons why you should curate your wardrobe during this time:

1. It will make you more mindful of your wardrobe
It’s healthy to do a closet overhaul every once in a while because it helps you see what you have and reconnect with old treasures (yes, we are still talking about clothes).

2. You can limit your consumption of clothing
Being aware of what you own can help you by preventing shopping for duplicates or unnecessary additional items. This also means saving time, money, and, ultimately, the world’s resources.

3. It can shift your focus to longevity
Once you have a curated wardrobe, you can then focus on looking after the pieces of clothing you own, making the best of them for as long as possible. Plus, this new perspective often encourages you to buy more consciously the next time around, looking for items that will last.

4. You can save time and energy in the mornings
A curated wardrobe equals fewer options to drive you crazy with choices when getting dressed (even if you aren’t off anywhere very special right now). You already own the things that work best for you!

Read more

6 Podcasts Helping Business Owners Survive the Times of COVID-19

Podcasts are seeing an enormous surge in popularity at the moment, and if you are on the hunt for some informed business listening, or keen to learn about how to establish, grow and successfully run your own business, rest assured there are literally thousands of podcasts ready and able to tick these boxes. However, it’s clear that in times like these, this kind of content carries a great deal more weight, particularly as businesses around the globe face harsh realities. Millions of small business owners are feeling isolated and desperate, as the current global situation keeps many from opening their doors to customers. The coronavirus pandemic has plunged the $2.5tn (£2tn) global fashion industry into crisis with a “significant number” of firms expected to go bust in the next 18 months, putting millions of jobs at risk. Global fashion sales are predicted to fall by up to 30% in 2020 and the luxury end of the market will be even harder hit, with sales slumping by up to 40%, according to a bleak report by the Business of Fashion (BoF) and consultants McKinsey.

Even business owners who can power through these tough times, see that finding some balance or sense of normalcy in this chaos is no easy task. That’s why we would like to share some of our favourite podcasts for entrepreneurs or business owners looking for useful insight. If you’re unsure which podcasts to listen to, take a look at these suggestions as a starter. There is no large or small business focus in particular with these, simply a great coverage of topics which are more relevant now than ever.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown us that although living disparate realities, we are all in this together. Every single person on the planet is uncertain about what lies ahead in the next weeks or months, with no idea of how long the quarantine measures will last. What’s more, it’s hard to figure out what the world will look like on the other side of this pandemic. These are all situations that can easily lead to anxiety, but instead of spiralling, we have an alternative suggestion. Make some time to listen to the experts. We have discovered that plenty of business, retail, and fashion-oriented podcasts have made a turn in these weeks to cover essential tips and ways to cope during the pandemic. You’ll find some of our favorites below! Read more

What we are reflecting on this Earth Day…

What we are reflecting on this Earth Day…

In 2014 Gaia Vince, a freelance British environmental journalist, broadcaster and non-fiction author released an incredible book – Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. We don’t think that there could be a more timely time to talk about it, and recommend you pick it up. Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books 2015, it is a fascinating tour of the human side of climate change, complete with its perils. It holds a mirror up to humanity’s epoch to reveal all we have destroyed, but may yet be able to save. It follows the inspired efforts of ordinary people to adapt and survive with grace, in the words of The Human Age author, Diane Ackerman. Today we need ordinary people to adapt and survive with grace once more.

We are in the midst of a global tragedy, but in our sustainable spaces, we are best equipped to emerge on the other side fighting for a new normal. Earth Day, an annual event celebrated today around the world to demonstrate support for environmental protection, was itself founded in reaction to a tragedy. In early 1969, a well drilled by Union Oil Platform A off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, blew up. More than three million gallons of oil spewed, killing more than 10,000 seabirds, dolphins, seals, and sea lions. As an eventual reaction to this disaster, Earth Day was born. This year we have been given an apt theme of ‘climate action’— and that second word carries significant provocation.

Action.

COVID-19 has shown us that the competitive fashion industry can act and be collaborative in a way that no one imagined. And, shockingly, it can be agile. We have seen record short response times, factories being redirected in purpose overnight, and the notorious red tape and barriers – often used as excuses as per why change could not happen quick enough – literally disappearing.

We have proudly seen our partners TESLA providing ventilators, or the LVMH group producing hand sanitizer and previous design collaborator Christian Siriano making masks for hospitals. The speed to respond and disrupt the market is what has always needed to happen. This is encouraging. It shows what we can do, when needs must. And right now, needs must. We are hopeful about a new era for our industry. One of collective accountability and of a renewed, and actual, commitment to collaboration. Are you?

With love,

RCGD

YES AND Digital Earth Day Summit

Red Carpet Green Dress Founder Suzy Amis Cameron and CEO Samata to celebrate the 50th anniversary of #EarthDay with sustainable lifestyle summit, YES AND Digital Earth Day. The event will take place on April 22 530pm EST and is free to register, so please join the RCGD leaders in this conversation.

Stepping into a worldwide new chapter — the ECOrenaissance — on the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, ECOfashion Corp is organizing a Digital Earth Day Event on Wednesday April 22nd (EARTH DAY). The purpose of the event is to unite thought-leaders with a common passion for co-creating a sustainable world and to lead a larger conversation across industries including food, beauty, wellness and fashion. ECOfashion Corp are creating a compelling, virtual event that will draw a global audience.

The summit will be curated and hosted by ECOlifestyle pioneer, Founder & CEO of ECOfashion Corp and author of ecoRenaissance, Marci Zaroff, alongside actress, supermodel and fashion activist Amber Valletta and other pioneers. See full lineup below and click image to sign up for free!

7 Organisations Working to Improve Labour Conditions in Fashion Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

So often during times of crisis the question on our lips is, “Well, what can we do to help?” …right? Well, one possible answer to that probing question is that we we can support these organisations listed below, through donations or by volunteering if we can. These pioneers under our spotlight have been loud defenders of the most vulnerable groups ,and during these challenging times continue to be a voice for change. They create conscience and pressure governments and brands to do right by those without a platform. You can learn how to help these organisations on each of their websites above. The situation for garment workers around the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, is dire. And in the face of a growing number of garment and accessory workers being left stranded, many industry bodies are calling for action. Whether bringing attention to the current situation, or lobbying for governments and brands to take action, a number of organisations are emerging as a voice for the voiceless in this time of need. Take a look at our list below of some of the most impactful ones…

We have pulled together a list of 7 organisations working tirelessly to elevate the existence of garment workers around the world, and help create a better immediate present. At the frontlines of the fight for a more ethical industry for some time, these organisations have doubled up their efforts in these tough times, with a focus on humane supply chains, exposing thoughtless practices and exercising pressure for major actors to make things right as soon as possible. The digital platforms listed below are currently some of the best for those seeking up-to-the-minute news about the impact of COVID-19 on garment workers and vulnerable groups in the fashion industry. Many are actively lobbying brands and governments, to step up and take responsibility for workers and citizens around the world, particularly in Southeast Asia, Africa, Central America, and Eastern Europe.

Clean Clothes

A global network operating since 1989, Clean Clothes is probably the oldest and most respected organisation focused on the improvement of the fashion industry. Clean Clothes pushes awareness of the dire conditions in supply chains, with a focus on garment workers’ fundamental rights. Clean Clothes educate and mobilise consumers to make more conscious fashion purchases, lobby companies and governments to improve conditions, and offer direct guidance and education for workers around the world about their rights. 

The Clean Clothes mission works alongside unions, raises awareness, explores and pushes for fairer legislation, and also develops and sustains a network of workers throughout the world. We are in awe.

The Fair Wear Foundation

Fair Wear Foundation wants to see a world where the garment industry supports workers in realising their rights to safe, dignified, properly paid employment. Fair Wear focus on garment production, specifically sewing, cutting and trimming processes – the most labour intensive parts of the supply chain. Fair Wear works with 130 member brands, who are committed to finding a fairer way to make clothes. It engages directly with factories, trade unions, NGOs and governments to find answers to problems others think are unsolvable.

Fair Wear started back in 1999 when the FNV, a Dutch trade union, and the Clean Clothes Campaign, an advocacy group for garment workers, got together to improve labour conditions in the garment industry. Today, Fair Wear has a staff of more than 50 employees working closely with some 130 member brands towards a fairer and more ethical fashion industry.

More and more consumers are looking for ethical and sustainable clothing brands committed to fair business practices, but how can a customer trust whether a company’s claims to fair practices are true? The only way to be sure is through third-party checks. To gain real insight into our member brands’ performance, Fair Wear conduct checks at three levels: at the brand level to see which current business practices and management decisions are likely to create problems down the line at the factory level and which are helping support better labour conditions; at the factories to inspect working conditions; and lastly, by hearing directly from the garment workers. These thorough checks boost credibility for our member brands and provide the starting point for real change to occur.

Read more

How Big Brands Can Help Vulnerable Garment Workers During the COVID-19 Crisis

Factories all over the world have had to put workers on furlough over decreased orders from big brands, plus a lack of materials coming in from China. This has meant uncertainty for millions of people who barely survive with their regular full wages.

Yet our problems did not start with COVID-19. The fashion industry has been highly compartmentalised for decades, to cheapen costs as much as possible: brands outsource factory work in developing nations, and in turn, these factories outsource workers. It’s a supply chain of contractors that translates into cheaper clothes with a dangerously high human cost. When orders are abruptly canceled, factories are often left without a cushion to pay their employees. In many cases, there aren’t even enough funds to pay for already completed work.

Photo credit: Made in Bangladesh

The chain is set up to avoid liability in any time of crisis, leaving a vast, vulnerable population to its own devices. And these are the same people, key workers who, in normal times and conditions, make up the foundation of production for big textile and fashion brands.

Low-paying garment workers in textile-producing countries across the developing world are some of the hardest-hit by the current coronavirus pandemic. In Southeast Asia, Central America, Eastern Europe, and other parts of the world, people are being left without jobs, wondering about their immediate or midterm futures. As it is, factories have traditionally only paid garment workers barely enough to support themselves and their families, leaving many without the kind of savings some are lucky to turn to during tougher times, let alone a worldwide crisis like the one we’re now facing. Many of the garment workers are not allowed to unionise, and receiving the protections of health insurance has always seemed like a distant dream, which just got farther away.

One of the most devastating things about the COVID-19 pandemic is how it is brutally exposing the vast inequalities that have become a norm in too many industries, fashion included. Millions of people expectantly await on the next cycle of news, wondering if this will be the day when they get some answers and a glimmer of hope for their families.

The European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights recently published a report, revealing that major brands are falling back on the practices that allow supply chains to function the way they currently do. Too many companies are washing their hands of the factories and workers that provide crucial services for them overseas without due consideration. In fact 72.4% of Bangladesh’s garment suppliers – whose orders were canceled en masse as the pandemic gathered rapid momentum – cannot presently offer any payment to workers during leave, and 80.4% are unable to cover severance pay when having to dismiss employees due to the crisis.

The current supply chains of fast fashion makes it too easy for big brands to dump any liabilities and flee, leaving people who were already tethering on the poverty line, to fall deeper within it. Yet this could be the time when brands make a change and step up to the responsibilities that come with employing overseas labour. There are actions fashion companies can take to improve the current situation and make way for a more humane industry going forward. Flexibility is vital during these challenging times!

What Brands Can Do Now

Honour Current Commitments
Honouring current commitments is the bare minimum brands can do. Brands with budget should pay for completed and in-production work, even if future orders are now on hold. It’s also important to be flexible with deadlines, as current health restraints and lack of materials will make it difficult to maintain the same delivery timelines.

Ensure Wages
The most significant issue workers are currently facing is not knowing when the next paycheck is coming. Big brands can and should continue to cover the wages of all the staff employed at the onset of the pandemic across departments, whether they’re in charge of directly making garments or in logistics. This should come regardless of technical employment status, whether contractors or full-time employees. It is also crucial that workers maintain their legal benefits, including severance payments and health insurance.

Create Emergency Relief Funds
Whilst the responsibility does not fall entirely on brands and retailers to provide relief, where possible there should be some contribution alongside that of financial institutions (both local and global) and governments. As the world experiences the economic consequences of the pandemic, we have started to see initiatives from government entities appearing to support the most vulnerable. This must occur on a macro level as well, particularly from the global brands who have expanded their factory presence overseas. Time is of the essence in this scenario, and brands must make sure that funds reach their vulnerable workers in the speediest way possible.

Avoid Dismissals
Times are undoubtedly tough, and the easiest path would seem to cut ties with factories and workers until the situation returns to some form of normalcy. However, in our industry, nobody is having it tougher than factory workers in developing nations and we all know it. For them, keeping some income can quite literally make a difference between living and dying – virus aside. Dismissed workers in garment-making countries will have to face a practically nonexistent job market as factories everywhere will be undergoing the same processes. While the best-case scenario is keeping workers on furlough receiving their full salaries, even a pay cut is better than leaving them to earn no income during this tough time.

Maintain Proper Health Conditions
Some factories will continue to operate, whether they are creating high-street apparel or war-like provisions – like face masks. In those cases, brands must commit to keeping employees and contractors safe. Factories must follow indications from national and global authorities regarding social distance, use of masks and so on, providing the applicable supplies for workers.

Prioritise Labour Rights
The health emergency cannot become an excuse to belittle workers’ rights. Brands with a strong presence in garment-making countries have all the power to ensure that proper labour conditions are followed. Often, countries whose GDP is greatly bolstered by the ready made garment industry will have strong labour laws that are not enforced, and this is not the time for lax measures. The right to freely associate must be protected at all costs and also, most importantly, the right to refuse work if conditions are not suitable. If factories are not taking every possible measure to keep workers healthy, employees must be able to choose to stay home without that posing a risk for their employment and income.

What Brands Can Do When the COVID-19 Emergency Passes
The fast fashion industry has been in dire need of an overhaul for quite some time, and the effects of this pandemic should be the highest wake-up call received. Supply chains around the world must improve and shift towards a more human-centric approach. Building more resilient supply chains needs to become the priority when this is all over, and there must be a focus on better lives for workers, from living wages to social benefits.

Fast fashion needs to change after this pandemic and become more conscious of the people who depend on it. Prices should be adjusted, and supply chains must strive towards a safer industry for all who work in it. It is the job of brands to step up towards a more mindful industry, yes, but it is also our job as consumers and activists to demand more from them as we go forward. It’s important to remember which brands step up during this crisis and which ones leave their workers stranded, and act accordingly in the days post COVID-19. We can come out of this stronger by putting our part in growing from this, becoming more conscious as companies and consumers.

The video is here! Red Carpet Green Dress™ Gala 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe

On Feb 6, 2020, the Annual Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) Pre-Oscars Gala in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe hosted an intimate dinner and cocktail party with over 100 friends, partners and industry executives. The launch celebrated a collaboration between textile giant Lenzing’s new luxury brand TENCEL™ Luxe and Red Carpet Green Dress to launch a range of eco-couture materials.

Red Carpet Green Dress™ Gala 2020 in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe from Suzy Amis Cameron on Vimeo.

The 11th Pre Oscar party was held at the private residence of Absolut Elyx CEO, Jonas Tahlin. Guests in attendance included this year’s ambassadors Kaitlyn Dever (Unbelievable, Booksmart), Léa Seydoux (Spectre, Bond: No Time to Die), and Elena Andreicheva (BAFTA winner and current Oscar® nominee), who were also announced on the evening, along with past partners and allies including Danielle Macdonald, Tiffany Haddish, Tyrese Gibson, Meena Suvari and Zelda Williams. The RCGD X TENCEL™️ Luxe textiles were unveiled on the 92nd Academy Awards ®️ red carpet as couture gowns worn by actress Léa Seydoux , Elena Andreicheva and Kaitlyn Dever.

Sustainability needs to be inclusive of all efforts

Red Carpet Green Dress are proud to have been featured in a recent InStyle article. Our campaign’s work at the Oscars earlier this year was put in the spotlight and we are truly appreciative. At RCGD we work towards making sustainability inclusive – of people and of efforts. We believe that sustainability is for everyone. It is for all genders, races, ages, and orientations, and it is also for all movements. This means respecting people promoting upcycling and recycling, vintage or locally made, circular economy or second hand, you name it. We need to open the doors and include more voices, not create more restricted-access sections in private rooms.

 

Take a look at the interview with InStyle written by the phenomenal Alden Wicker who spoke to RCGD CEO Samata and Laura Jones, celebrity and fashion stylist and founder of the sustainable fashion magazine The Frontlash, about why ‘Red Carpets Will Never Be the Same After the Pandemic Is Over’. Read it here now.

Below is an extract from the recent feature, you can find the whole article by clicking above!

“Red Carpet Green Dress has always incorporated recycled or vintage elements into celebrity looks, including Naomie Harris’ 2013 Oscars dress that featured vintage beads, and Emma Roberts’ archival Armani piece from the 2017 Oscars. “Still, I don’t agree that that is the ‘the most’ sustainable,” RCGD CEO Samata said by email in February. “Whilst rewearing or spotlighting vintage is crucial, if we are not changing the way fashion is being made on a mass scale … we will continue to drown in a sea of waste. At RCGD we completely believe in sustainability being more than just one thing and strive to spotlight that every single year.”

RCGD at 2020 Sustainable Fashion Forum

Red Carpet Green Dress CEO to join esteemed panel for 2020 Sustainable Fashion Forum. More than just an event, The Sustainable Fashion Forum is a unique experience that brings a wildly passionate community of conscious-minded consumers together with brands, industry leaders, and change-makers for an experience unlike any other. The forum is the place where curious minds gather online + IRL to connect & offer fresh perspectives on the issues and trends influencing sustainable fashion.

Find out more here.

 

Kudos to Fashion Revolution

Fashion Revolution is a global movement calling for more transparency in the fashion industry, also known as the movement behind ask #WhoMadeMyClothes #WhatsInMyClothes. The team have ingeniously created a Guide to Hosting a *Digital* Event for Fashion Revolution Week, so if you’ve been planning a swap, talk, workshop, film screening or demonstration, this is the go-to manual for making it virtual. In the words of the organisation, whilst we may not be able to mingle in our communities, the simple guide for digitising Fashion Revolution Week events, from film screenings to workshops and panel discussions, will ensure that you can share your Fashion Revolution with citizens around the world. Considering that we are just a fortnight away from the start of #FashionRevolution Week 2020 (and yes things will be a little different this year) it is time to get to work, using the platforms and access we god have to leverage collective action through social media. Take a look at the fantastic guide below!

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A Thought For The Labour Behind The Label

We are living in strange and uncertain times. It was impossible to know a few months ago that our world would be turned on its head by the massive global that emergency Covid-19 has proven to be. For the first time in a century, our planet faces the threat of a pandemic, one that has steadily made its way into some of the most populated countries across the globe. We are stepping into uncharted territory. Our thoughts and prayers are with the people infected and those who have lost someone along the way. During this time of uncertainty, we must also think of our colleagues, the garment workers in the fashion industry.  

Image courtesy of Labour Behind The Label

Fashion is one of the most wide-reaching industries in the world, and a crisis of this magnitude is bound to have direct consequences on those who depend on it for their livelihood. Over 300 million people work in different levels of the fashion supply chain around the world, with Fashion United placing the labour force number at approximately 161.0 million. At its core this means there are hundreds of millions of families that depend on clothes making to make a humble living. From textile producers, seamstresses, designers, and everyone in between, every clothing item each of us has ever worn is the result of the labour of many. And so many of these people, nearly invisible but totally essential parts of the puzzle, are struggling during the times of Covid-19. The pandemic has meant a loss of jobs for millions across the globe, and the fashion industry is one of the hardest hit. Last week, Sourcing Journal reported on a huge hit to the industry: with brands cancelling over $100 million worth of orders in Bangladesh alone. Current estimates say that as many as 80% of local clothing factories won’t be able to pay workers for more than a month if this situation continues. Read more

The A-Z of Sustainable Fashion

This A-Z sustainable fashion glossary will help you understand key terms, enrich your knowledge about eco-fashion and keep you up to speed on the conversations going on around you. Happy learning!

A

Artisan is a skilled craft worker who makes or creates material objects partly or entirely by hand. When possible, look for clothes made by craftspeople and artisans. This supports their traditional and artisanal expertise, skills and processes to preserve their cultural heritage. Be aware of cultural appropriation (or misappropriation) – this is the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture.

B

Biodegradable means that a product can break down naturally without any negative effects on the environment, such as releasing harmful chemicals. In the fashion industry, biodegradable often refers to non-synthetic fabrics such as organic cotton (description below), silk, and hemp — those without dyes and finishing chemicals.

C

Circular fashion refers to the entire lifecycle of a product and centers on a circle of create, use, recycle, rather than create, use, dispose. It looks at products beyond their original function and timespan and focuses on how their materials can be consistently utilized and repurposed. Circular fashion takes in to consideration everything including the design, sourcing, transportation, storage, marketing, sale and disposal of the product.

D

Dematerialisation is the reduction of products sold to consumers; a countermovement of materialism.

E

Eco-friendly, like sustainability, is an all encompassing term that takes many factors into account. “Eco” is short for ecology, the study of interaction between organisms and the environment. Therefore, eco-friendly is about minimizing anything that would negatively affect that balance.

F

Fast fashion is the term used to describe clothing that is produced quickly and cheaply. Brands and retailers that engage in fast fashion often create products based on seasonal trends directly inspired by the runway. Fast fashion brands are generally associated with overproduction, low retail prices, mass waste, poor working conditions, and negative environmental impact.

G

Greenwashing is what happens when a brand gives a false impression of its sustainable endeavors. With the increasing demand for sustainability in the fashion industry, some brands are launching “sustainable” capsules. Through a line like that, the brand hopes to convince consumers that that small collection speaks for the brand’s production values as a whole, regardless of whether or not that’s actually the case.

H

Hemp is often considered an environmental “super fibre”. Hemp fabric is made from the fibres in the herbaceous plant of the species cannabis sativa. It’s a high-yield crop that produces significantly more fibre per acre than either cotton or flax.

I

Industrial ecology optimizes the total material’s cycle from virgin fabric to finish, to an element, to a product, to be obsolete, and to the final disposal. The optimized component includes factors such as resources, energy, and capital.

J

Jute is a 100% biodegradable and very affordable natural fibre that grows well without fertilisers or pesticides. It can be used to make hessian and is very commonly plaited or woven to make the soles of espadrille shoes.

K

Km0 fabrics and accessories produced within a supply chain where the manufacturing phases are carried out locally in order to reduce long distance transportation emissions and pollution.

L

Life cycle thinking describes a thought process that considers environmental impacts over the entire life cycle of a product and not just at one point (e.g. manufacturing or recovery).

M

Minimalism is about reducing the amount of stuff that you own. It’s not about having nothing; it’s about having less. Focusing on what matters by decluttering and removing what’s burdening us. It can mean having a minimal amount of clothes in your wardrobe but not necessarily.

N

Natural fibres are fibres extracted from natural sources such as soy and hemp as opposed to synthetic fibres made from chemicals and plastic that negatively impact our environment.

O

Organic is a term we see a lot in the food industry, but it also applies to fashion. It refers to raw materials that are not genetically modified (GM) and have been grown without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, sewage sludge, ionizing radiation or other artificial ways. The term ‘organic’ generally has a positive context, but just because a product is organic does not make it ethical.

P

Product carbon footprint is a measure of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to goods, from the extraction of raw materials and manufacturing to its use and to the final re-use, recycling or disposal.

Q

Qualitative fashion is when fashion adheres to high standards of production without creating an imbalance in the ecological footprint. It not only means that your clothing is free of any defect, is made using the best quality raw materials, but also is not impacting the environment and people in this pursuit.

R

Recycling is the action of converting waste into something reusable. For example, some brands have turned plastic bottles into yarn to make fleece sweaters or coats. Fabrics and accessories can be made from recycled – pre or post consumer – or second life fibres or materials.

S

Slow fashion is a countermovement against fast fashion and refers to increased consideration of the processes and resources required to make clothing, particularly focusing on sustainability; it is a movement that prioritizes quality over quantity.

T

Transparency and traceability go hand-in-hand. In order to be transparent, a brand shares the names and information about every factory (and ideally every worker) involved in the manufacturing process. In turn, this gives a product traceability, meaning consumers can trace a product and its components back through each step of the supply chain, right down to its raw material.

U

Upcycling also turns waste into reusable material, but of better quality. Upcycling removes waste from the system; it requires less energy than recycling, and so has a better environmental impact.

V

Value chain is the process by which a company adds value to a product including production, marketing, and the provision of after-sales service. Many problems of fast fashion lie in the value chain because companies try to maximise value by exploiting human resources and natural resources.

W

Waste Management – Adoption of waste saving technologies and measures, like reuse and recycle.

Y

Yarn can be made from all sorts of things, from natural materials including cotton and wool, to man-made ones like recycled plastic bottles. It can then be knitted or woven into clothing and accessories.

Z

Zero waste fashion refers to items of clothing that generate little or no textile waste in their production. It is part of the broader Sustainable fashion movement. We can divide it into two general approaches. Pre-consumer zero-waste fashion eliminates waste during manufacture. Post-consumer zero-waste fashion generates clothing from post-consumer garments such as second-hand clothing, eliminating waste at what would normally be the end of the product use life of a garment.

Sustainability is more than one thing – CEO Message

A message from our CEO

“Sustainability is more than one thing. Over the years, our campaign has put a spotlight on sustainability through a number of different perspectives. These have included vintage, recycling, artisan, handmade, repurposing, vegan, quality over quantity, fairtrade, botanical solutions and zero-waste. Our incredible ambassadors and the fashion brands we have worked with represent many cultures and backgrounds (21 countries to be exact), and have connected with different elements of this movement too. Some with vintage, some with upcycling, others with plant-based solutions and others with a focus on quality. The common denominator has been their interest and willingness to put themselves out there and be part of making one small sustainable statement, sharing their platform to help us reach a wider audience, and engage with more people. When someone has made a small or big change in their lifestyle due to interacting with our campaign, it is a win for us. We believe in going from moment to movement. The sustainable journey starts with one step. These different passions reflect the diverse landscape that sustainability truly is. It will never be just one thing, and no single cause owns the conversation. It’s time that we  stop using sustainability as a way to out-green each other, or shame people out of the dialogue. We embrace our vintage enthusiasts, our plant-based advocates, our artisan community, our quality over quantity voices and all the other people working in the middle of, of the outskirts of, the sustainable fashion space. All of these voices make a difference and add value. So whilst we support the number of different ways sustainable can be expressed, we don’t support a ‘my way or the highway’ attitude. Let’s work together to show the ways sustainability can speak to a global audience and include, not exclude people. Let’s not erase voices, just because they come from someone whose eco-mission is not the same as ours. We can only shift the needle together, with our different perspectives adding value to the conversation.”

Samata, CEO – Red Carpet Green Dress

At Red Carpet Green Dress, we recognise that sustainable fashion is an important area with many interpretations. Some believe it can be defined by a no-waste, circular economy approach, others by the use of solely organic or certified materials or a reduced carbon print production process. Others believe it is about a fair and humane treatment of manufacturers and a clear supply chain, or even recycling. For us, it is any/all of the above. As part of our general design criteria, we believe that sustainable fashion means producing garments with consideration of the environmental and social impact that they will have throughout its total life cycle. Take a look at some of the videos of our campaign over the years in the media channel, and find out more about our criteria here.

Take a look at Channel RCGD in our new media section

As part of the ‘Creative Distractions’ section in our newly launched THE HUB section on rcgdglobal.com, you can find our new Channel RCGD which features exclusive and new video content and gallery images of our campaign over the years. Hopefully providing some much needed light entertainment and relief for our community during an unsettling and unpredictable time.

Why we need more eco-textiles in the world…

Dear Community,

You might have heard that we recently launched an eco-textile line with TENCEL Luxe (which will be on sale later this year) but did you know why we decided to pursue this new area of business? One word, impact. With its huge environmental impact through waste, water consumption, chemical use, greenhouse gas emissions, soil degradation and rainforest destruction, the fashion industry remains a top polluter. It produces 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions due to its long supply chains and energy intensive production. Clothing represents more than 60% of the total textiles used globally and in the last 15 years, clothing production has approximately doubled. Specifically, textiles matter and we want to be part of making a positive difference in this area.

It is hard to imagine living in a world without them. Nearly everyone, everywhere comes into contact with textiles all the time, and they create a huge environmental impact in the world. Fibers form the basis of the fashion industry – without fibers we have no textiles, and without textiles we have no fashion industry. The global eco fiber market size is growing, with natural eco fibers the second largest segment – accounting for 22.6% of the global market. We tried to make sense of this and created the following infographic to help people find out more about how significant the textile industry is. Take a look and let us know your thoughts…

Samata

Take the quiz

Eco-warriors, we have just the game for you…

Question – have you ever randomly wondered exactly how much your wardrobe is impacting the planet? Earlier this year online thrift store ThredUp launched a useful tool that calculates just how much your fashion habits impact the environment, based on what’s in your wardrobe. The newly debuted Fashion Footprint Calculator by ThredUP and Green Story involves answering 11 questions, starting with how many items customers buy each year, whether you use rental platforms and how many times you return online-bought clothing items. It also asks users about laundry habits, whether they dry clean, and if they ever purchase from sustainable fashion brands. Using this information, the calculator then identifies your individual fashion footprint and compares it to the average consumer, who contributes a whopping 1,620 pounds of carbon emissions per year only through their fashion choices.
The company’s new Fashion Footprint Calculator also shares the best ways to reduce that footprint, with explanations about how these actions make a direct impact. The fashion industry produces more harmful carbon emissions than the aviation and shipping industries combined. New apparel production releases 4M tons of harmful carbon emissions annually, contributing more than 8% of global greenhouse emissions. We all know that the single best thing we can do for the planet is consume less and reuse more, and we love this tool because it both educates and provides advice on how we can all do better. The calculator makes the problems we face on our individual quests to be eco-warriors a little less challenging. Take a look.

Dear Sustainable Fashion Community

Dear Sustainable Fashion Community,

First and foremost, we hope that you, your friends and family are all keeping safe. At Red Carpet Green Dress, we are well aware of how unsettling these times are for the entire world. This pandemic affects us all – personally, emotionally, spiritually, financially – as a global community. It is hard to stay positive even under the best of circumstances. That is why we are sharing this message and reaching out to let you know how we’re working, what we’re working on, and what you can expect over the coming weeks.

We hope, and need, for sustainability as a thought process and a lifestyle choice to become the norm. Fast fashion and pushing consumerism has no place in our modern, evolved times. All around us, we have found friends and family asking themselves, ‘What do I really need to live a purposeful life? What makes me content? Do we need to buy a new thing?’.

Now more than ever the conversation about sustainability is even more relevant. As each day of this pandemic progresses dare we say that we are discovering that the only things we need are safety (ours and that of our loved ones), quality time and the ‘essentials’ for our existence. Everything else is a beautiful bonus, to be enjoyed but not in devastating excess. Small, local and slow is beautiful. We need to appreciate the time we have – to make less, live more and respect the earth.

In the fashion industry, the impact of coronavirus COVID-19 is causing far-reaching change. Things will never be the same again. This is not only a tragedy for those who have lost their lives, but a wake up call for all of us who are fortunate enough to remain on the planet. The pandemic is impacting our industry, and many others, most devastatingly. From the front line fields to the most luxury of fashion brands. We have created a resource here on our website to help as much as we can, in the way we know how. In addition we are working on launching a few initiatives which we hope will enable us to do our bit to support those struggling to stay afloat, but also the creatives around the world with neither hope nor inspiration.

Here, in our little hub, you will find useful articles, helpful lists, light hearted pointers for those seeking a little creative inspiration and more. As an organisation we have plans to help our much beloved industry during this challenging time which we will be announcing shortly – sign up here to stay in our green loop.

We remain hopeful that now and going forwards we can pull together and pull each other through.

Suzy & Samata

RCGD launches THE HUB for COVID-19

As the coronavirus takes its toll on the global economy, businesses of all sizes, sectors and markets face an uncertain future. The fashion and retail industries in particular need to steer through changing consumer sentiment, shuttered stores and disruption to the usual cadences of seasonality. Here, in our little hub, you will find useful articles, helpful lists, pointers for designers seeking a little inspiration and more. We have more initiatives planned to help our much beloved industry during a challenging time. We remain helpful that now and gong forwards we can pull together and pull each other through.

Take a look at THE HUB here.

Reading Lists

As the world goes into lockdown, readers are starting to look for meaningful substance in their bookcases, searching for distraction, inspiration, refuge or escape. Whether you’re a long time follower of sustainable fashion, new to the scene or just a little curious and want to educate yourself on how to become a more thoughtful consumer, we have the recommended book for you. Here you can find some of the reads that our Red Carpet Green Dress team love when it comes to our much-loved topic of sustainable fashion.

Ellen Ruppel Shell – Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture

From the shuttered factories of the Rust Belt to the strip malls of the Sun Belt-and almost everywhere in between-America has been transformed by its relentless fixation on low price. This pervasive yet little- examined obsession with bargains is arguably the most powerful and devastating market force of our time, having fueled an excess of consumerism that blights our land­scapes, escalates personal debt, lowers our standard of living, and even skews of our concept of time.

Francesca Romana Rinaldi and Salvo Testa – The Responsible Fashion Company: Integrating Ethics and Aesthetics in the Value Chain

In The Responsible Fashion Company, Rinaldi and Testa argue that the fashion industry is at a crossroads: the need for a global shift to a sustainable model has never been more urgent. Yet, they demonstrate that we are witnessing a revolution led by conscious consumers and enlightened companies, who are redefining the rules of the fashion market. The question is: when will the rest of the industry catch up? Rinaldi and Testa raise a fundamental but often neglected issue in the fashion sustainability debate: long-term equilibrium can only be achieved by integrating economic goals with environmental, social and ethical values.

Andrew Brooks – Clothing Poverty: The Hidden World of Fast Fashion and Second-hand Clothes

Following the journey of a pair of jeans Clothing Poverty takes the reader on a vivid around the world tour to reveal how clothes are manufactured and retailed bringing to light how fast-fashion and clothing recycling are interconnected. Andrew Brooks shows how recycled clothes are traded across continents and uncovers how fast-fashion retailers and international charities are embroiled in commodity chains which perpetuate poverty, and exposes the hidden trade networks which transect the globe. Read more

Eco must-listens whilst in quarantine

Most of us are glued to the screen way more than we would typically like to be right now! Still, it’s important to find the time to give your eyes a break. Even if that opportunity does not present itself,  you might just be keen to listen to something new whilst you are multi-tasking. We recommend diving into the exciting world of sustainable fashion, to be educated and entertained at the same time, by way of a decent podcast. Take a good look at the list of sustainable and ethical fashion listening material that we have pulled together for you. These brilliant audios cover everything from conscious fashion philosophies to the impact of fast fashion, it’s all here. Happy listening!

1. Conscious Chatter

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It’s a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

2. Wear Your Values

Whether you’re just beginning to learn about sustainable fashion, or you’re a fashion-conscious veteran, it can be difficult to determine just what sustainability or other buzz words like transparency, eco-friendly, fair fashion, or even ethical, mean within the context of fashion. For that reason, the ‘Wear your Values’ podcast was created. We absolutely love it.

3. Fashion Fix with Charli Howard

Since her social media post about body diversity in fashion went viral in 2015, model Charli Howard has been on a mission to explore the big issues in the industry. Now, she’s sharing what she’s learned in a new BBC podcast, Fashion Fix. What makes ethical dress sense for people and planet? Model Charli Howard shows us how to be sustainable and stylish with the podcast that fixes fashion while fixing the world.

4. Fashion Revolution Podcast

In Fashion Revolution Podcast, Tamsin Blanchard investigates the issues behind fast fashion. Speaking to garment workers, supply chain experts, activists and politicians, she chews over the hidden facts behind fashion production and the rag trade. There’s only four episodes for listeners to tune into, but it’s all you need to start understanding the true cost of the fashion industry and starting asking, “Who Made My Clothes?”…well worth a listen!

5. American Fashion Podcast

Exploring fashion as an art and a business. American Fashion Podcast is the fashion show for fashion people, diving deep into the designing, making, and selling of garments and accessories through long-form interviews with people at all levels and in all corners of the business, with an emphasis on sustainability and innovation, since 2014. Hosted by Charles Beckwith and Cathy Schepis.

6. Spirit of 608

Stories, tips and advice from women at the intersection of fashion, entrepreneurship, sustainability and tech. It’s F.E.S.T., and it’s the future. Hosted by fashion journalist Lorraine Sanders. The weekly episodes are a great resource for people looking to start or expand their own ethical fashion business.

7. The Ethical Business Podcast

Ethical Business Podcast is hosted by two Australian start-up entrepreneurs, Melanie Palmer and Ross Townson, both of whom had previously worked in international development for the Australian Government. Topics include the creation of a clean supply chain, health-conscious products, waste reduction and fair labor practices, and the focus skews to startups and small and mid-size businesses.

8. Business With Purpose

Business with Purpose takes you “behind the scenes” with some of the world’s most generous entrepreneurs with host Molly Stillman of “still being molly blog – stillbeingmolly.com.” From the CEOs of mission-driven brands, to directors of small, community non-profits, and everything in between, Molly is sitting down with men and women who believe in changing the world through not only their personal lives, but also their professional careers. We believe that every person was created with a purpose, for a purpose and this podcast gives inspiration for how we can all make an impact by supporting businesses with purpose.

9. Costing the Earth

Hosted by the BBC News Rural Affairs Correspondent Tom Heap, this weekly radio segment on anthropogenic impacts to the environment as a podcast is riveting. Just under 30 mins long, each episode investigates a single news topic, ranging from the legal recourse of climate refugees, to the promise of geothermal energy in Sub-Saharan Africa. Occassionaly recorded on-site, resulting in a full soundscape of chirping birds, bubbling rivers, buzzing bees and the occasional snorting pig.

Let us know if we missed any from our list!

P.S I Made This…

Be it the UK’s knitting revival, the proliferation of global DIY sites like P.S I Made This and I Fix It, US brand Patagonia’s garment repair kits for customers or new technological innovations that make our relationship to clothes more intimate – a more creative, individual and sustainable approach to clothing is emerging. Whether it’s making garments by hand or understanding our surroundings more through our clothes, the future looks more personal for fashion. When it comes to creative distractions during this challenging time, we absolutely love this P.S I Made This…

The innovative lifestyle brand founded by Erica Domesek is the ultimate destination for customization and personalization. Domesek’s mission is to inspire and empower people around the globe to cultivate their inner-creativity and embrace the ever-growing do-it-yourself (DIY) way of life. Born from Erica’s passion for hand-making beautiful objects and accessories that make everyday life more beautiful and fun, the brand launched as a website in 2009.

Shortly thereafter, Elle Magazine dubbed Erica “Fashion’s Queen of DIY”. With a focus on stylish living with a personal touch, psimadethis.com features hundreds of projects that feature clear, step-by-step instructions and vivid inspiration alongside exciting digital content, as well as a guide to the essential products and tools that encourage you to roll up your sleeves, get crafty, and dive into DIY.

We encourage you to dive in and try something at home, you might surprise yourself!

Gift Bag Thanks!

WITH GRATITUDE FOR OUR GIFT BAG ITEMS…

Our event brochure was printed sustainably by Pureprint Group, a CarbonNeutral® company with FSC® chain of custody and an ISO 14001 certified environmental management system recycling over 99% of all dry waste. The paper is Carbon Balanced with The World Land Trust, an international conservation charity, who offset carbon emissions through the purchase and preservation of high conservation value land.  Through protecting standing forests, under threat of clearance, carbon is locked in that would otherwise be released.

The apple-waste journals (animal friendly, sustainable and all natural) and bamboo pens in the RCGD™ gift bags were provided by Ethical Swag, a leading on-line distributor of sustainably sourced logo branded merchandise in North America. Ethical Swag simplify the sourcing of fabulous products and provide options that are a true reflection of values, changing the way customers experience your brand.

Organic to Green, an award-winning luxury, artisan wellness and beauty lifestyle company founded in Los Angeles, CA have been creating award-winning luxury artisan green beauty products for 10 years, including the award winning and editor favorite liquid coconut oil, COCO OILS, and other non-toxic products found in our RCGD™ gift bags. Organic To Green’s Infrared Bungalow and Spas lead the evolution in wellness and clean beauty spas for those who seek a positive environment to rebalance.

Thanks to First Child Productions for organising the event!

RCGD In Partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe

In an exciting new step to expand its impact within the global fashion industry, Red Carpet Green Dress™ has collaborated with textile giant Lenzing’s new luxury brand TENCEL™ Luxe to launch a range of eco-couture textiles. The inaugural launch will deliver a game-changing solution to the fashion world, particularly red carpet fashion, which lacks a comprehensive range of natural material solutions. Find out more about the collaboration here…

RCGD In Partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe from Suzy Amis Cameron on Vimeo.

Bafta Award Winner & Oscar® Nominee Elena Andreicheva Makes Academy Awards® Debut In Eco-conscious Laura Basci Gown As Part Of Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress™ In Collaboration With Tencel™ Luxe

RCGD X TENCEL LUXE UNVEIL NEW TEXTILE AS A PART OF THE ETHICAL DESIGN 

LOS ANGELES (FEB. 9, 2020) ​– Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress™(RCGD) in collaboration with TENCEL™ Luxe, has partnered with BAFTA winner and one of the few female Oscar® nominees Elena Andreicheva, for this year’s campaign.  Andreicheva, nominated for her work on the documentary short Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (if you’re a girl), made her debut at the 92nd Academy Awards ® wearing an eco-conscious bespoke Laura Basci gown. The dress is hand made, hand beaded with swarovski crystals in Basci’s studio in Los Angeles. The fabric is part of the newly launched Red Carpet Green Dress textile range made from TENCEL™ Luxe filament yarn, blended with cashmere.

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 09: Director Elena Andreicheva attends the 92nd Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood and Highland on February 09, 2020 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)

Laura Basci is a Swiss fashion designer based in Los Angeles. Laura Basci focuses on using sustainability in her work. It is the brand’s mission to combine luxury designs with environmental consciousness.

RCGD was conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron during the press tour for her husband, James Cameron’s film “Avatar”. In partnership with The Academy Awards®, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste, circular economy approach, social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain and, importantly, materials which use a high proportion of eco-friendly and recycled materials. Turning red carpet moments into sustainable design movements in 2020 and beyond, the organization will continue its sustainable collaborations with impact brands, educational initiatives for emerging talent, in addition to the creation of groundbreaking digital content.

Leading fashion houses Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable gowns for the biggest award show in the world, The Academy Awards®. Established campaign representatives have included Naomie Harris, Olga Kurylenko, Kellan Lutz, Gina Rodriguez, Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Priyanka Bose, Lakeith Stanfield, Zoey Deutch, Camila Alves, Danielle Macdonald and Laura Harrier. 

To qualify as a RCGD eco-conscious garment, each piece must either be made from sustainable materials, including organic, recycled or repurposed fibers. Other features include using hand-made detailing or incorporating natural dye processing, with a dedicated focus on minimal negative impact on the environment, and environmentally and socially responsible design. TENCEL™ Luxe filament yarns are made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel.
 
The sustainable criteria is overseen by Good On You, a partner of RCGD. Good On You is the world’s leading rating system on ethical and sustainable fashion to assist people in making positive shopping choices–all delivered through an accessible app.
 
For more information please visit: www.rcgdglobal.com

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About Red Carpet Green Dress™:

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization. Conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste approach, focusing on social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain, and materials which use a high proportion of recycled and biodegradable materials. 

Leading fashion houses including Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable red carpet wear. Celebrities including Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Gina Rodriguez, LaKeith Stanfield, Kellan Lutz, Camila Alves, and Naomie Harris have joined the campaign as representatives. RCGD™ has been featured in Vanity Fair, W Magazine, People, Hello Giggles, The Hollywood Reporter, WWD, Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, VOGUE, Refinery29, The Guardian, ELLE, LA Times, The New York Times, InStyle and others.

 

About TENCEL™ Luxe

Aspiring to lead the pursuit of eco-friendly solutions for textiles, garments, and fashion, TENCEL™ Luxe targets premium and luxury brands that aim to blend high fashion with sustainability while maintaining quality and reputation. TENCEL™ Luxe is the first cellulose filament yarn made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel. With silky smoothness, liquid-like drape and color vibrancy, it is designed for sensuality yet engineered with environmental responsibility. Supremely smooth to the touch. As the eco-botanic version of silk, TENCEL™ Luxe offers the bridge between supreme quality and sustainable fashion.

About TENCEL™

TENCEL™ is the textile specialty brand under The Lenzing Group that covers specialty product offerings for apparel and home. TENCEL™ products define a new evolutionary step in terms of sustainability, functional benefits, and natural comfort. Featuring botanic origin and biodegradable quality, TENCEL™ Modal and Lyocell fibers are gentle on skin with smooth, long-lasting softness, color vibrancy and color retention features. TENCEL™ Modal and TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers are designated by the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) BioPreferred® Program. Product brands under TENCEL™ includes TENCEL™ Active, TENCEL™ Denim, TENCEL™ Home, TENCEL™ Intimate, TENCEL™ Luxe and TENCEL™ for Footwear.

About the Lenzing Group

The Lenzing Group stands for ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. As an innovation leader, Lenzing is a partner of global textile and nonwoven manufacturers and drives many new technological developments.  

The Lenzing Group’s high-quality fibers form the basis for a variety of textile applications ranging from elegant ladies clothing to versatile denims and high-performance sports clothing. Due to their consistent high quality, their level of biodegradability and compostability, Lenzing fibers are also highly suitable for hygiene products and agricultural applications. 

The business model of the Lenzing Group goes far beyond that of a traditional fiber producer. Together with its customers and partners, Lenzing develops innovative products along the value chain, creating added value for consumers. The Lenzing Group strives for the efficient utilization and processing of all raw materials and offers solutions to help redirect the textile sector towards a closed-loop economy.

Key Facts & Figures Lenzing Group 2018

Revenue: EUR 2.18 bn

Nameplate capacity: 1,034,000 tons

Employees: 6,839

TENCEL™, VEOCEL™, LENZING™, REFIBRA™, ECOVERO™, LENZING MODAL™, LENZING VISCOSE™, MICROMODAL™ and PROMODAL™ are trademarks of Lenzing AG.

 ABOUT ELENA ANDREICHEVA:

Elena Andreicheva is an Oscar®-nominated  and BAFTA-winning Producer and Filmmaker based in London, working across documentaries that fuse personal stories with powerful journalism. She has collaborated with some of the media industry’s top production companies on films for the BBC, C4, National Geographic and A&E among others, producing work on a variety of hard-hitting and hard-access topics – incarceration (12-YEAR-OLD LIFER, INSIDE THE GANGSTERS’ CODE), the war on drugs (DRUGS INC.) and human trafficking (SAVING THE CYBERSEX GIRLS). For her latest film as Producer, LEARNING TO SKATEBOARD IN A WARZONE (IF YOU’RE A GIRL), directed by Carol Dysinger, she filmed with girls training to skateboard and striving for an education in Afghanistan despite an oppressive culture. The film has won a BAFTA for British Short Film and Best Documentary Short at the Tribeca Film Festival and the IDA Documentary Awards. It has also been nominated for an Oscar®. Elena also directed the award-winning short POLISH GO HOME, looking into the immigration crisis in Britain through the eyes of a Polish family. She is currently developing a slate of features.

Media Contact:
Red Carpet Green Dress
Christina Garvin
T: 805.229.1612
E: Christina@sundaripr.com

ELENA ANDREICHEVA SHINES ONSTAGE AT THE OSCARS® WEARING A LAURA BASCI GOWN, MADE FROM EXCLUSIVE RCGD X TENCEL™ LUXE SUSTAINABLE TEXTILES

Andreicheva Takes Home Oscar For “Best Documentary Short Subject”

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 09: (L-R) Carol Dysinger and Elena Andreicheva accept the Documentary – Short Subject – award for ‘Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone If You’re a Girl’ onstage during the 92nd Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on February 09, 2020 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES — Filmmaker Elena Andreicheva shone on the Dolby Stage at the Academy Awards®  in a bespoke sustainable Laura Basci gown as a part of Red Carpet Green Dress™(RCGD) initiative in collaboration with TENCEL™ Luxe. Andreicheva took home an Oscar® for  Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (if you’re a girl)The dress is handmade with fabric which is part of the newly launched Red Carpet Green Dress textile range made from TENCEL™ Luxe filament yarn, blended with cashmere. Hand-beaded with Swarovski crystals in Basci’s studio in Los Angeles. Laura Basci is a Swiss fashion designer based in Los Angeles. Laura Basci focuses on using sustainability in her work. It is the brand’s mission to combine luxury designs with environmental consciousness.

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About Red Carpet Green Dress™:

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization. Conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste approach, focusing on social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain, and materials which use a high proportion of recycled and biodegradable materials. 

Golden Globe Nominee Kaitlyn Dever Arrives At The Oscars® In Custom-made Ethical Louis Vuitton As A Partner With Red Carpet Green Dress™ In Collaboration With Tencel™ Luxe

LOUIS VUITTON PARTNERS WITH CAMPAIGN FOR 2ND CONSECUTIVE YEAR

LOS ANGELES (FEB. 9, 2020) – Golden Globe and BAFTA nominee Kaitlyn Dever (Unbelievable, Booksmart) took a stand for sustainable fashion, when she arrived to the Oscars® wearing a breathtaking custom-made ethical gown by Louis Vuitton as an ambassador for Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) in collaboration with TENCEL™ Luxe. The Louis Vuitton custom-made gown is made of ethical and eco-responsible certified silk satin, embroidered with Swarovski crystals and glass beads. 

This is the second consecutive year Louis Vuitton has partnered with the global change-making organization. It is with partners like Vuitton and TENCEL™ Luxe, RCGD is able to create red carpet “moments” and make them “movements” bringing sustainable designs to the forefront of conversation and action within the fashion industry.

RCGD is a women-led global change-making organization creating red carpet “moments” to “movements” bringing sustainable designs to the forefront of conversation and action within the fashion industry. It was conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron during the press tour for her husband, James Cameron’s film “Avatar”. In partnership with The Academy Awards®, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste, circular economy approach, social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain and, importantly, materials which use a high proportion of eco-friendly and recycled materials. Turning red carpet moments into sustainable design movements in 2020 and beyond, the organization will continue its sustainable collaborations with impact brands, educational initiatives for emerging talent, in addition to the creation of groundbreaking digital content.

Leading fashion houses Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable gowns for the biggest award show in the world, The Academy Awards®. Established campaign representatives have included Naomie Harris, Olga Kurylenko, Kellan Lutz, Gina Rodriguez, Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Priyanka Bose, Lakeith Stanfield, Zoey Deutch, Camila Alves, Danielle Macdonald and Laura Harrier. 

To qualify as a RCGD eco-conscious garment, each piece must either be made from sustainable materials, including organic, recycled or repurposed fibers. Other features include using hand-made detailing or incorporating natural dye processing, with a dedicated focus on minimal negative impact on the environment, and environmentally and socially responsible design.

The sustainable criteria is overseen by Good On You, a partner of RCGD. Good On You is the world’s leading rating system on ethical and sustainable fashion to assist people in making positive shopping choices–all delivered through an accessible app.

For more information please visit: www.rcgdglobal.com

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About Red Carpet Green Dress™:

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization. From moment to movement we bring sustainable design to the forefront of conversation and action within the fashion industry. The campaign was conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron during the press tour for her husband, James Cameron’s film “Avatar”. In partnership with The Academy Awards®, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste, circular economy approach, social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain and, importantly, materials which use a high proportion of eco-friendly and recycled materials. Turning red carpet moments into sustainable design movements in 2020 and beyond, the organization will continue its sustainable collaborations with impact brands, educational initiatives for emerging talent, in addition to the creation of groundbreaking digital content.

Leading fashion houses Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable gowns for the biggest award show in the world, The Academy Awards®. Established campaign representatives have included Naomie Harris, Olga Kurylenko, Kellan Lutz, Gina Rodriguez, Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Priyanka Bose, Lakeith Stanfield, Zoey Deutch, Camila Alves, Danielle Macdonald and Laura Harrier. RCGD™ has received international coverage from a respected platforms including Vanity Fair, W Magazine, People, Hello Giggles, The Hollywood Reporter, WWD, Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, VOGUE, Refinery29, The Guardian, ELLE, LA Times, NY Times, InStyle and other respected platforms. 

 About Louis Vuitton:
Since 1854, Louis Vuitton has brought unique designs to the world, combining innovation with style, always aiming for the finest quality. Today, the House remains faithful to the spirit of its founder, Louis Vuitton, who invented a genuine “Art of Travel” through luggage, bags and accessories which were as creative as they were elegant and practical. Since then, audacity has shaped the story of Louis Vuitton. Faithful to its heritage, Louis Vuitton has opened its doors to architects, artists and designers across the years, all the while developing disciplines such as ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories, watches, jewelry, and fragrance. These carefully created products are testament to Louis Vuitton’s commitment to fine craftsmanship. For further information: www.louisvuitton.com

About TENCEL™ Luxe

Aspiring to lead the pursuit of eco-friendly solutions for textiles, garments, and fashion, TENCEL™ Luxe targets premium and luxury brands that aim to blend high fashion with sustainability while maintaining quality and reputation. TENCEL™ Luxe is the first cellulose filament yarn made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel. With silky smoothness, liquid-like drape and color vibrancy, it is designed for sensuality yet engineered with environmental responsibility. Supremely smooth to the touch. As the eco-botanic version of silk, TENCEL™ Luxe offers the bridge between supreme quality and sustainable fashion.

About TENCEL™

TENCEL™ is the textile specialty brand under The Lenzing Group that covers specialty product offerings for apparel and home. TENCEL™ products define a new evolutionary step in terms of sustainability, functional benefits, and natural comfort. Featuring botanic origin and biodegradable quality, TENCEL™ Modal and Lyocell fibers are gentle on skin with smooth, long-lasting softness, color vibrancy and color retention features. TENCEL™ Modal and TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers are designated by the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) BioPreferred® Program. Product brands under TENCEL™ includes TENCEL™ Active, TENCEL™ Denim, TENCEL™ Home, TENCEL™ Intimate, TENCEL™ Luxe and TENCEL™ for Footwear.

About the Lenzing Group

The Lenzing Group stands for ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. As an innovation leader, Lenzing is a partner of global textile and nonwoven manufacturers and drives many new technological developments.  

The Lenzing Group’s high-quality fibers form the basis for a variety of textile applications ranging from elegant ladies clothing to versatile denims and high-performance sports clothing. Due to their consistent high quality, their level of biodegradability and compostability, Lenzing fibers are also highly suitable for hygiene products and agricultural applications. 

The business model of the Lenzing Group goes far beyond that of a traditional fiber producer. Together with its customers and partners, Lenzing develops innovative products along the value chain, creating added value for consumers. The Lenzing Group strives for the efficient utilization and processing of all raw materials and offers solutions to help redirect the textile sector towards a closed-loop economy.

Key Facts & Figures Lenzing Group 2018

Revenue: EUR 2.18 bn

Nameplate capacity: 1,034,000 tons

Employees: 6,839

TENCEL™, VEOCEL™, LENZING™, REFIBRA™, ECOVERO™, LENZING MODAL™, LENZING VISCOSE™, MICROMODAL™ and PROMODAL™ are trademarks of Lenzing AG.

About Kaitlyn Dever:

Golden Globe nominee Kaitlyn Dever has amassed tremendous respect at a young age with her dynamic and impactful performances in film and television. Currently, Dever is in production on Hulu’s upcoming anthology series, MONSTERLAND, opposite Jonathan Tucker. Based on the short stories by Nathan Ballingrud, the series will follow a group of people who, after experiencing encounters with mermaids, fallen angels, and other strange beasts, are desperate to repair their lives, ultimately showing that there is a thin line between man and monster. She presently stars in Netflix’s 8-episode limited series UNBELIEVABLE, the true story of Marie, a teenager who was charged with lying about having been raped, and the two female detectives (Toni Collette and Merritt Wever) who followed a twisting path to arrive at the truth. The series debuted on September 13, 2019. Dever’s standout performance earned her nominations in the Lead Actress of a Limited Series category for both the Golden Globe Awards and Critics’ Choice Awards. In May 2019, Dever starred in Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut, BOOKSMART, opposite Beanie Feldstein, Billie Lourd, and Noah Galvin. Dever and Feldstein lead as two overachieving high schoolers who set out to cram four years of fun into one night before they graduate. Annapurna Pictures produced the film, which was released to critical acclaim in May 2019 following a successful world premiere at SXSW Festival. Dever was recognized by the Hollywood Critics Association as the 2020 Breakthrough Artist Under the Age of 23, and was named an EE BAFTA Rising Star nominee for her performance. 


Media Contact:
Red Carpet Green Dress
Christina Garvin
T: 805.229.1612
E: Christina@sundaripr.com

James Bond Lead Actress Léa Seydoux Stuns In Custom-made Sustainable Louis Vuitton Gown At The Oscars® Representing Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress™ In Collaboration With Tencel™ Luxe

ECO-FRIENDLY GOWN FEATURES ONE-OF-A-KIND ETHICAL TEXTILE CREATED & LAUNCHED BY RCGD X TENCEL™ LUXE 

LOS ANGELES (FEB. 9, 2020) – James Bond Spectre actress Léa Seydoux represented Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress™(RCGD) initiative in collaboration with TENCEL™ Luxe, as she shined on the red carpet at 92nd Academy Awards ® wearing an ethical and eco-responsible custom-made gown in a newly launched Red Carpet Green Dress textile made from TENCEL™Luxe filament yarn, and organic silk faille paired with custom-made organic Louis Vuitton satin sandals.

This is the second consecutive year, Louis Vuitton has partnered with the global change-making organization and has dressed three celebrity ambassadors.  Earlier today Unbelievable actress Kaitlyn Dever arrived in custom Louis Vuitton, and last year the global fashion house dressed RCGD ambassador Laura Harrier (BlackKklansman). It is with partners like Louis Vuitton, Seydoux, Dever, Harrier and TENCEL™ Luxe, RCGD is able to continue to create red carpet “moments” and make them “movements” bringing sustainable designs to the forefront of conversation and action within the fashion industry.

RCGD was conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron during the press tour for her husband, James Cameron’s film “Avatar”. In partnership with The Academy Awards®, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste, circular economy approach, social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain and, importantly, materials which use a high proportion of eco-friendly and recycled materials. Turning red carpet moments into sustainable design movements in 2020 and beyond, the organization will continue its sustainable collaborations with impact brands, educational initiatives for emerging talent, in addition to the creation of groundbreaking digital content. Leading fashion houses Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable gowns for the biggest award show in the world, The Academy Awards®. Established campaign representatives have included Naomie Harris, Olga Kurylenko, Kellan Lutz, Gina Rodriguez, Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Priyanka Bose, Lakeith Stanfield, Zoey Deutch, Camila Alves, Danielle Macdonald and Laura Harrier. 

To qualify as a RCGD eco-conscious garment, each piece must either be made from sustainable materials, including organic, recycled or repurposed fibers. Other features include using hand-made detailing or incorporating natural dye processing, with a dedicated focus on minimal negative impact on the environment, and environmentally and socially responsible design. TENCEL™ Luxe filament yarns are made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel. The sustainable criteria is overseen by Good On You, the world’s leading rating system on ethical and sustainable fashion to assist people in making positive shopping choices – all delivered through an accessible app. 

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About Red Carpet Green Dress™:

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization. Conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste approach, focusing on social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain, and materials which use a high proportion of recycled and biodegradable materials. 

Leading fashion houses including Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable red carpet wear. Celebrities including Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Gina Rodriguez, LaKeith Stanfield, Kellan Lutz, Camila Alves, and Naomie Harris have joined the campaign as representatives. RCGD™ has been featured in Vanity Fair, W Magazine, People, Hello Giggles, The Hollywood Reporter, WWD, Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, VOGUE, Refinery29, The Guardian, ELLE, LA Times, The New York Times, InStyle and others.

About TENCEL™ Luxe

Aspiring to lead the pursuit of eco-friendly solutions for textiles, garments, and fashion, TENCEL™ Luxe targets premium and luxury brands that aim to blend high fashion with sustainability while maintaining quality and reputation. TENCEL™ Luxe is the first cellulose filament yarn made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel. With silky smoothness, liquid-like drape and color vibrancy, it is designed for sensuality yet engineered with environmental responsibility. Supremely smooth to the touch. As the eco-botanic version of silk, TENCEL™ Luxe offers the bridge between supreme quality and sustainable fashion.

About TENCEL™

TENCEL™ is the textile specialty brand under The Lenzing Group that covers specialty product offerings for apparel and home. TENCEL™ products define a new evolutionary step in terms of sustainability, functional benefits, and natural comfort. Featuring botanic origin and biodegradable quality, TENCEL™ Modal and Lyocell fibers are gentle on skin with smooth, long-lasting softness, color vibrancy and color retention features. TENCEL™ Modal and TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers are designated by the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) BioPreferred® Program. Product brands under TENCEL™ includes TENCEL™ Active, TENCEL™ Denim, TENCEL™ Home, TENCEL™ Intimate, TENCEL™ Luxe and TENCEL™ for Footwear.

About the Lenzing Group

The Lenzing Group stands for ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. As an innovation leader, Lenzing is a partner of global textile and nonwoven manufacturers and drives many new technological developments.  

The Lenzing Group’s high-quality fibers form the basis for a variety of textile applications ranging from elegant ladies clothing to versatile denims and high-performance sports clothing. Due to their consistent high quality, their level of biodegradability and compostability, Lenzing fibers are also highly suitable for hygiene products and agricultural applications.

The business model of the Lenzing Group goes far beyond that of a traditional fiber producer. Together with its customers and partners, Lenzing develops innovative products along the value chain, creating added value for consumers. The Lenzing Group strives for the efficient utilization and processing of all raw materials and offers solutions to help redirect the textile sector towards a closed-loop economy.

Key Facts & Figures Lenzing Group 2018

Revenue: EUR 2.18 bn

Nameplate capacity: 1,034,000 tons

Employees: 6,839

TENCEL™, VEOCEL™, LENZING™, REFIBRA™, ECOVERO™, LENZING MODAL™, LENZING VISCOSE™, MICROMODAL™ and PROMODAL™ are trademarks of Lenzing AG.

 About Louis Vuitton

Since 1854, Louis Vuitton has brought unique designs to the world, combining innovation with style, always aiming for the finest quality. Today, the House remains faithful to the spirit of its founder, Louis Vuitton, who invented a genuine “Art of Travel” through luggage, bags and accessories which were as creative as they were elegant and practical. Since then, audacity has shaped the story of Louis Vuitton. Faithful to its heritage, Louis Vuitton has opened its doors to architects, artists and designers across the years, all the while developing disciplines such as ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories, watches, jewelry, and fragrance. These carefully created products are testament to Louis Vuitton’s commitment to fine craftsmanship. For further information: www.louisvuitton.com

About Léa Seydoux 

Léa Seydoux is an award-winning actress who will reprise her role as ‘Madeleine Swann’ in the upcoming James Bond franchise, NO TIME TO DIE, opposite Daniel Craig, Ana de Armas, and Lashana Lynch later this year. Additionally, she will star in the upcoming Wes Anderson film, THE FRENCH DISPATCH alongside Timothée Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan, Willem Dafoe, and Bill Murray, among others. Seydoux is known for her previous work in Drake Doremus’ ZOE opposite Ewan McGregor, and Thomas Vinterburg’s KURSK opposite Colin Firth and Matthias Schoenaerts. She also starred alongside Marion Cotillard, Vincent Cassel and Gaspard Ulliel in Xavier Dolan’s film, IT’S ONLY THE END OF THE WORLD, winner of the Grand Prix and the Ecumenical Jury Prize at Cannes. Other credits include Mosco Boucault’s French Drama, OH MERCY! Sam Mendes’ SPECTRE, Benoît Jacquot’s DIARY OF A CHAMBERMAID, and Yorgos Lanthimos’ THE LOBSTER, opposite Rachel Weisz, Colin Farrell and John C. Reilly, which won the Jury Prize at Cannes.  In 2014, Seydoux starred in several films including Bertrand Bonello’s SAINT LAURENT, which was nominated for several awards at Cannes; Wes Anderson’s THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL opposite Ed Norton, Ralph Fiennes, Adrien Brody and Billy Murray, which went on to win four Oscars® ; Christophe Gans’ BEAUTY AND THE BEAST alongside Vincent Cassel, winning the César Award for “Best Production Design.” In 2013, Seydoux starred opposite Adèle Exarchopoulos in Abdellatif Kechiche’s BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR. The French romantic coming-of-age drama was the first film to have the Palme d’Or awarded to both the director and the lead actresses, with Seydoux and Exarchopoulos becoming the only women (apart from director Jane Campion) to have ever won the award.

PHOTOS FROM THE RED CARPET GREEN DRESS™ PRE-OSCARS GALA IN PARTNERSHIP WITH TENCEL™ LUXE

This Evening, February 6, the annual Red Carpet Green Dress (RCGD) Pre-Oscars Gala in partnership with TENCELLuxe hosted an intimate dinner and cocktail party with over 100 friends, partners and industry executives to celebrate their collaboration with textile giant Lenzing’s new luxury brand TENCEL™ Luxe, to launch a range of eco-couture materials.

Credit: Jose Perez

The event was held at the Absolut Elyx house in the Hollywood Hills, where RCGD founder Suzy Amis Cameron’s husband James Cameron hosted the evening. Celebrities in attendance included this year’s ambassadors Kaitlyn Dever (Unbelievable, Booksmart), Léa Seydoux (Spectre, Bond: No Time to Die), and Elena Andreicheva (BAFTA winner and current Oscar® nominee), who were also announced on the evening, along with past partners and allies including Danielle Macdonald, Tiffany Haddish, Meena Suvari, Zelda Williams and Tyrese Gibson.

The RCGD movement continues this week as Andreicheva and Seydoux debut eco-conscious gowns made using the inaugural textiles designed by top global designers at the 92nd Academy Awards®. The designers will be revealed on Oscar® Sunday, February 9, 2020. 

For additional information on the details and exclusive announcements that took place during the RCGD Pre-Oscars Gala, please refer to the official press release. 

 

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) in partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe collaborate with eco-luxury designer Matea Benedetti

Pictured: Harold Weghorst, Vice President of Global Brand Management, Lenzing AG, Red Carpet Green Dress CEO Samata and designer Matea Benedetti

The best thing about creating a beautiful dress is knowing that everyone involved with the process has the same passion for the environment and for creating beautiful sustainable pieces as we do. We have been working alongside TENCEL™ Luxe and the leading ethical luxury fashion brand @Benedetti.Life to create a bespoke dress made from one of the textiles from our RCGD X TENCEL™ collaboration which is made from 100% TENCEL™ Luxe filament yarn derived from wood pulp from sustainably managed sources…which means it is also 100% plant-based. Thank you to @VeganFashionWeek™ for your support!

Matea of Benedetti Life: Questioning the form and function of the dress, the textile manipulations inspired Matea Benedetti (@Benedetti.Life) a conceptual vision of Haute Couture as an art destined to dress bodies that are always unique and planet friendly. Handmade details remember a historical renaissance collar and the upper part of the body was inspired from flowers and feather textures. This dress was made with the innovative Red Carpet Green Dress™️ textile derived from 100% TENCEL™️ Luxe yarn. The dress is animal free and able to biodegrade – under industrial, home, soil and marine conditions – within 8 to 12 weeks. Created exclusively by Benedetti Life for Red Carpet Green Dress™️ (RCGD).

RED CARPET GREEN DRESS™ COLLABORATES WITH LENZING’S TENCEL™ LUXE TO LAUNCH SUSTAINABLE ECO-COUTURE TEXTILES AND ANNOUNCES AMBASSADORS FOR OSCARS® 2020 CAMPAIGN

February 6, 2020 (LOS ANGELES)– 

In an exciting new step to expand its impact within the global fashion industry, Red Carpet Green Dress™ has collaborated with textile giant Lenzing’s new luxury brand TENCEL™ Luxe to launch a range of eco-couture textiles. The inaugural launch will deliver a game-changing solution to the fashion world, particularly red carpet fashion, which lacks a comprehensive range of natural material solutions.

The RCGD X TENCEL™ Luxe textiles will be unveiled on the 92nd Academy Awards ® red carpet as couture gowns worn by actress Léa Seydoux (Spectre, Bond: No Time to Die), and Oscar® nominated producer Elena Andreicheva (Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone- If You’re a Girl). A stunning design created by leading ethical luxury designer Benedetti Life will also be featured at the Red Carpet Green Dress™ Pre-Oscar Gala in Los Angeles on February 6th. Also representing the campaign and making a sustainable style statement on the Oscars® red carpet will be Golden Globe & BAFTA nominee Kaitlyn Dever (Booksmart & Unbelievable). 

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization founded by leading environmental advocate, Suzy Amis Cameron. RCGD has delivered its noteworthy Oscars red carpet design initiative with the Annual Academy Awards® for over a decade, dressing ambassadors such as Naomie Harris, Emma Roberts and Lakeith Stanfield in sustainable formal wear. 

 

 

“When we started the Red Carpet Green Dress™ journey 10 years ago, the hunt for textiles was both challenging and a cause for reflection,” shares Suzy Amis Cameron, Founder of RCGD. “Sustainable fabrics were just not easy to find, and even with dedicated resources, finding the right fabric for an Oscars worthy gown nearly proved impossible. Fast forward 10 years and sustainable fashion has become the mainstay we always knew it would.”

 

RCGD has collaborated with some of the top fashion brands from around the world including Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Reformation and Armani, and has delivered global student-focused programs with fashion colleges including ESMOD Paris since 2009. RCGD will now take its work beyond the red carpet to create an industry movement with its partnership with TENCEL™ Luxe. A revolutionary milestone for sustainable textiles, TENCEL™ Luxe will set a new benchmark in the future of eco-couture. In a world where clothing represents more than 60% of the total textiles used globally, this launch has the potential to create significant positive change. TENCEL™ Luxe branded filament yarns are of 100% botanic origin and are produced using a renewable wood source. Made specifically for the high-fashion sector, the yarns will come in a variety of weights with varying mixes of the revolutionary TENCEL™ Luxe yarn, including a luxury textile derived exclusively from the filament yarn, a lush silk blend, and a rich cashmere fusion.

 

“We are proud to partner with our friends at Red Carpet Green Dress™ to introduce sustainable alternatives for eco-couture,” added Harold Weghorst, Vice President of Global Brand Management, Lenzing AG. “We are thrilled that more world-leading organizations are taking a bigger stride to promote sustainability, and we will continue to work closely with brands and industry partners to not only drive sustainability in day-to-day fashion, but also in haute-couture and red carpet looks.”

 

Under the leadership of the new CEO of RCGD, Samata, the textiles will be milled in Asia and available worldwide later this year to emerging and established designers. “Only a tiny percentage of the leading fashion brands are capable of tracking their garments back to the fiber origin, and with our TENCEL™ Luxe collaboration we plan to be part of the movement to make this the norm,” shares Samata. “We are excited to be part of providing a solution for the global fashion industry market.

 

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About Red Carpet Green Dress

Red Carpet Green Dress™ (RCGD) is a women-led global change-making organization. Conceived in 2009 by Suzy Amis Cameron, RCGD challenges designers from around the world to deliver eco-friendly garments through a no-waste approach, focusing on social impact consideration, fair and humane treatment of manufacturers, a clear supply chain, and materials which use a high proportion of recycled and biodegradable materials.

Leading fashion houses including Louis Vuitton, Vivienne Westwood, Armani, Elie Saab, Swarovski, Christian Siriano, Bulgari, Dunhill and Reformation have joined the campaign to create sustainable red carpet wear. Celebrities including Sophie Turner, Emma Roberts, Gina Rodriguez, LaKeith Stanfield, Kellan Lutz, Camila Alves, and Naomie Harris have joined the campaign as representatives. RCGD™ has been featured in Vanity Fair, W Magazine, People, Hello Giggles, The Hollywood Reporter, WWD, Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, VOGUE, Refinery29, The Guardian, ELLE, LA Times, The New York Times, InStyle and others.

 

About TENCEL™ Luxe

Aspiring to lead the pursuit of eco-friendly solutions for textiles, garments, and fashion, TENCEL™ Luxe targets premium and luxury brands that aim to blend high fashion with sustainability while maintaining quality and reputation. TENCEL™ Luxe is the first cellulose filament yarn made from sustainable wood resources using a close loop production process awarded with the EU Ecolabel. With silky smoothness, liquid-like drape and color vibrancy, it is designed for sensuality yet engineered with environmental responsibility. Supremely smooth to the touch. As the eco-botanic version of silk, TENCEL™ Luxe offers the bridge between supreme quality and sustainable fashion.

 

About TENCEL™

TENCEL™ is the textile specialty brand under The Lenzing Group that covers specialty product offerings for apparel and home. TENCEL™ products define a new evolutionary step in terms of sustainability, functional benefits, and natural comfort. Featuring botanic origin and biodegradable quality, TENCEL™ Modal and Lyocell fibers are gentle on skin with smooth, long-lasting softness, color vibrancy and color retention features. TENCEL™ Modal and TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers are designated by the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) BioPreferred® Program. Product brands under TENCEL™ includes TENCEL™ Active, TENCEL™ Denim, TENCEL™ Home, TENCEL™ Intimate, TENCEL™ Luxe and TENCEL™ for Footwear.

 

About the Lenzing Group

The Lenzing Group stands for ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. As an innovation leader, Lenzing is a partner of global textile and nonwoven manufacturers and drives many new technological developments.  

The Lenzing Group’s high-quality fibers form the basis for a variety of textile applications ranging from elegant ladies clothing to versatile denims and high-performance sports clothing. Due to their consistent high quality, their level of biodegradability and compostability, Lenzing fibers are also highly suitable for hygiene products and agricultural applications. The business model of the Lenzing Group goes far beyond that of a traditional fiber producer. Together with its customers and partners, Lenzing develops innovative products along the value chain, creating added value for consumers. The Lenzing Group strives for the efficient utilization and processing of all raw materials and offers solutions to help redirect the textile sector towards a closed-loop economy.

 

Key Facts & Figures Lenzing Group 2018

Revenue: EUR 2.18 bn

Nameplate capacity: 1,034,000 tons

Employees: 6,839

TENCEL™, VEOCEL™, LENZING™, REFIBRA™, ECOVERO™, LENZING MODAL™, LENZING VISCOSE™, MICROMODAL™ and PROMODAL™ are trademarks of Lenzing AG.

 

 

 

RCGD and Textile Enquiries:

Samata 

CEO

samata@rcgdglobal.com

 

Media Contact: 

Lenzing – TENCEL™ Luxe
Rita Ng

T: (852) 3718 5675

E: r.ng@lenzing.com

 

We have a special auction live to celebrate our special red carpet season!

Since its inception, Red Carpet Green Dress has grown to include brand collaborations, internships, knowledge-share platforms and educational experiences for students, and our remit continues to grow. The sustainable fashion movement has been gathering momentum recently as more information, techniques, textiles and support becomes available. For nearly a decade our campaign has built upon a reputation associated with consideration, due diligence, authenticity, high impact and sustainable education. We continuously strive to create knowledge sharing platforms and connect resources between the brands we work with and the independent suppliers we seek out. Through our work we engage local communities from environmental schools to design colleges, to help the emerging generation of talent find a meaningful and environmentally-focused place within the design world. Red Carpet Green Dress have worked with fashion colleges around the world, including the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising and Fashion Institute of Technology to create internship and work experience opportunities for young designers.

To date our campaigns have worked with designers and emerging talent from over 21 countries, specifically China, Scotland, Ireland, UK, Ukraine, India, Brazil, Australia, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Wales, Poland, France, Lebanon, Italy, Ghana, Venezuela, New Zealand, Cambodia and the USA.

Through our fundraising in 2020 we aim to keep providing opportunities to emerging design talents whilst delivering sustainable solutions to the fashion industry. Be part of helping us to make a difference! Find out about our Tesla Factory Tour Auction right here, which kicks off our season of fundraising. This unique experience offers you and a guest a behind-the-scenes tour of Tesla’s revolutionary factory in Fremont, CA (Not open to the public).